American Orders & Societies and Their Decorations: The Objects of the Military and Naval Orders, Commemorative and Patriotic Societies of the United States and the Requirements for Membership Therein, with Illustrations in Colored Relief (Google eBook)

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Jennings Hood, Charles James Young
Bailey, Banks & Biddle Company, 1917 - Military decorations - 107 pages
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Page 94 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war ; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 30 - Citizens by birth or choice, of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of AMERICAN, which belongs to you, in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism, more than any appellation derived from local discriminations.
Page 31 - If in the opinion of the people the distribution or modification of the constitutional powers be in any particular wrong, let it be corrected by an amendment in the way which the Constitution designates. But let there be no change by usurpation, for though this in one instance may be the instrument of good, it is the customary weapon by which free governments are destroyed.
Page 30 - The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government.
Page 31 - I repeat it, therefore, let those engagements be observed in their genuine sense. But, in my opinion, it is unnecessary and would be unwise to extend them. Taking care always to keep ourselves, by suitable establishments, on a respectable defensive posture, we may safely trust to temporary alliances, for extraordinary emergencies.
Page 31 - It is important, likewise, that the habits of thinking in a free country should inspire caution in those intrusted with its administration to confine themselves within their respective constitutional spheres, avoiding in the exercise of the powers of one department to encroach upon another.
Page 31 - The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is, in extending our commercial relations to have with them as little political connection as possible.
Page 95 - That the distinctive badges adopted by Military Societies of men who served in the armies and navies of the United States, in the War of the Revolution, the War of 1812...
Page 31 - As a very important source of strength and security, cherish public credit. One method of preserving it is to use it as sparingly as possible...
Page 60 - To act in matters of voluntary relief and in accord with the military and naval authorities as a medium of communication between the people of the United States of America and their Army and Navy...

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