London Pictures: Drawn with Pen and Pencil. With One Hundred and Thirty Illustrations (Google eBook)

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Religious Tract Society, 1890 - London (England) - 223 pages
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Page 35 - THREE Poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed; The next in majesty , In both the last. The force of Nature could no further go ; To make a third, she joined the former two.
Page 199 - For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world; looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour 168 Jesus Christ; who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.
Page 159 - For the Lord shall comfort Zion: he will comfort all her waste places; and he will make her wilderness like Eden, and her desert like the garden of the Lord; joy and gladness shall be found therein, thanksgiving, and the voice of melody.
Page 151 - EPITAPH. ON THE COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE. UNDERNEATH this sable hearse Lies the subject of all verse, Sidney's sister, Pembroke's mother : Death, ere thou hast slain another, Fair, and learned, and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee.
Page 192 - And leave us rulers of your blood As noble till the latest day ! May children of our children say, " She wrought her people lasting good ; " Her court was pure ; her life serene ; God gave her peace ; her land reposed ; A thousand claims to reverence closed In her as Mother, Wife and Queen...
Page 144 - WHEN I am in a serious humour, I very often walk by myself in Westminster Abbey ; "where the gloominess of the place, and the use to which it is applied, with the solemnity of the building, and the condition oT the people who lie in it, are apt to fill the mind with a kind of melancholy, or rather thoughtfulness that is not disagreeable.
Page 204 - To merry London, my most kindly nurse, That to me gave this life's first native source, Though from another place I take my name. An house of ancient fame: There when they came whereas those bricky towers The which on Thames
Page 65 - Guildhall was a fearful spectacle, which stood the whole body of it together in view, for several hours together, after the fire had taken it, without flames, (I suppose because the timber was such solid oak) in a bright shining coal, as if it had been a palace of gold, or a great building of burnished brass.
Page 109 - Death is there associated, not, as in Westminster Abbey and St Paul's, with genius and virtue, with public veneration and with imperishable renown; not, as in our humblest churches and churchyards, with everything that is most endearing in social and domestic charities ; but with whatever is darkest in human nature and in human destiny, with the savage triumph of implacable enemies, with the inconstancy, the ingratitude, the cowardice of friends, with all the miseries of fallen greatness and of blighted...
Page 215 - London, much inhabited by writers of small histories, dictionaries, and temporary poems; whence any mean production is called Grub-street" , " lexicographer, a writer of dictionaries, a harmless drudge.

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