A Glossary of Literary Terms

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Harcourt Brace Jovanovich College Publishers, 1993 - Criticism - 301 pages
15 Reviews
This book defines and discusses terms, critical theories, and points of view that are commonly applied to the classification, analysis, interpretation, and history of works of literature.--[from preface]

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Very helpful quick-reference of terms. - Goodreads
Good reference book. - Goodreads
Bought this when I thought I would be writing more. - Goodreads
Especially when writing a literature paper. - Goodreads

Review: A Glossary of Literary Terms

User Review  - Hosein - Goodreads

This book has gathered literary terms of English language in one place successfully. Those students who wants to give English literature exam should get prepared with the help of this book. I can't ... Read full review

Review: A Glossary of Literary Terms

User Review  - Viking Paul - Goodreads

Indispensable. Read full review

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About the author (1993)

Meyer Howard Abrams was born in Long Branch, New Jersey in 1912. He studied English at Harvard University and attained his B.A. in 1934. He won a Henry fellowship to Cambridge University in 1935, where he was tutored by I. A. Richards. Abrams returned to Harvard for graduate school, and received his Masters' degree in 1937 and his PhD in 1940. Abrams set the standard of critical authority for American literary studies for the quarter century after World War II. He is the author of two syntheses of English Romantic thought, and has also been general and Romantic period editor of the most widely used college anthology of English literature; The Norton Anthology of English Literature, as well as author of a popular Glossary of Literary Terms, and several influential essays on English Romanticism. Abrams's dissertation written in 1940, was expanded and published in 1953 as The Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic Theory and the Critical Tradition. The Mirror and the Lamp contributed to the legitimation of English Romanticism as a field of study. Nearly 20 years later, in Natural Supernaturalism, Abrams asserted a different thesis with similar authority.

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