Roman Theatre

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Cambridge University Press, May 3, 2012 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 184 pages
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When we think of ancient theatre today, we tend to think of Greek theatre. Yet the Romans also had a lively and varied set of theatrical traditions, which have had a considerable influence on later drama. This book offers an introduction to these traditions, including the origins of Roman theatre, the extant plays of Plautus, Terence and Seneca, and the many works of comedy, tragedy, mime and pantomime that no longer survive as written texts. The emphasis throughout is on performance, the role of these theatrical works within Roman society, and Roman theatre's legacy.
  

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About the author (2012)

Timothy Moore is John and Penelope Biggs Distinguished Professor of Classics at Washington University, St Louis. He is author of Artistry and Ideology: Livy's Vocabulary of Virtue (1989), The Theater of Plautus: Playing to the Audience (1998), a translation of Terence's Phormio and numerous articles on Livy, Tibullus, Roman comedy, Petronius, ancient music and Japanese kyogen comedy. He has produced a website in which he sings songs of Plautus in their original rhythms (http: //uts.cc.utexas.edu/ timmoore/Recordings%20of%20Plautus/MoorePlautusRecordings.html). He has lectured widely in North America, Europe and China on topics including music archaeology, Western and Japanese comedy, Greek and Roman music, and analogies between Roman and American musical comedies. He also has extensive experience as a singer and as a performer in musical theatre. He has received fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the American Academy in Rome and the Loeb Classical Library Foundation, and a Mellon Faculty Fellowship at Harvard University.

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