The wanderings of Warwick (Google eBook)

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Printed for J. Bell, No. 148, Oxford Street, 1794
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Page 61 - ... of him to whom they belong; — This is particularly the cafe with houfe negroes, who never think that honour enough is done to thofe whofe property they are ; and indeed an infinite deal of pride and vanity is a principal ingredient in the temper of negroes •, and a woman...
Page 62 - ... morals or decency ; and perhaps in no part of the Chriftian world are appearances of morality fo little attended to as in the Weft India iflands. The condition however of the negroes is certainly in fome refpects even preferable to that of die Englifh poor. — An Englifhman, born to no other inheritance than the labour of his hands, can with difficulty earn enough to fupport even himfelf.
Page 63 - The parifh officers reluctantly find him a hovel, or a room ; — and with lefs furniture than is feen even in a negro- hut, he commences houfe-keeper. If his wife is notable, and he is himfelf induftrious^ he may exift for a year or two in tolerable comfort (living, however, upon little elfe than bread): but any remiffion in the labour of either, and an increafing family, expofe him. to the extremes of poverty : — he lofes his health for want of proper...
Page 49 - I find it fatiguing to adminifter fo continually to one woman's -vanity." " And thou wanteft more to adminifter to thine. — But underftand me, Warwick — If I can poflefs myfelf of an advantage to which you feem totally indifferent, and carry off this heirefs of the ifle — have I your confent?" " With all my foul, and I heartily wifh -you fuccefs — making only this bargain, Jack, that I won't have it faid fhe left me for you — No, damn it, that would be too mortifying — No, no; I will...
Page 61 - ... of England ; and, unlefs provoked by any tyrannical exertion of their mafters power, have no more malice againft them than our day-labourers againft the lord whofe ground they cultivate. On the contrary, the idea of their being the property of their mafter makes them take a peculiar intereft in whatever relates to him.
Page 260 - more than a third were Americans,"186 and, back in England, Warwick turns his affairs over to an old member of his regiment who "had been wounded in America, and returned with his health much impaired" and who did the business perfectly to my satisfaction; though I had unavoidably contracted so many debts in America, that I received not above a third of my arrears.187 A. sketchier but more lurid summary of military activities occupies about forty pages of Mrs. Rowson's Fille de Chambre, (1792) in...
Page 247 - I fancied myfelf about to fall into the hands of this cruel and arbitrary tribunal, or fome other equally unjuftand inhuman; and, though I had faced death in almoft all its forms, I own that it now appeared terrible — not fo much becaufe I feared to die (for I had been too familiar with the idea to fhrink from it on my own account), as becaufe the confequence of leaving Ifabella and her children defolate and unprotected, in a country where they could have no claim to private...
Page 119 - Aquilo, the eldef t fort of my mother's brother, was celebrated for his exploits in thefe combats; the hearts of feveral court ladies had feverely fuffered from his prowefs, and he had no rival in his honours but his next brother, Don Ifidor, who, at the two or three laft of thefe fpectacles, had equalled his fame : but the moft perfect friendfhip fubfifted between them, as well as with their younger brother, Don Francifco, and the three brothers were content with the univerfal fuffrage which was...
Page 267 - Ifabella, who did every thing in her power to fupport rriy fpirits, and conceal the uneafinefs that preyed upon her own, my heart fickened, and my courage failed, under the gloom of the rigid economy we were obliged to obferve, and the dread of our being reduced to difficulties yet more humiliating. I owed it, however, to my wife to bear with fortitude evils I had brought upon us, that I might not, by finking under them, increafe their weight to her. " ••• But it is difficult to fupport continually...
Page 283 - Gowan, who was, fhe protefted, " the mofh ignorant, taftelefs, and illiberal blockhead that ever aflumed the invidious trade of a critic." —She had not yet exhaufted her fevere epithets, or her violent anger, when the unfortunate object of it appeared, handing in the actrefs, to whom he fhewed the moft obfequious attention: To defcribe the fcene that now enfued would be difficult, unlefs it were in the way of dialogue. From that time the critic and poetefs became the moft implacable enemies, and...

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