The Mexican War: A History of Its Origin, and a Detailed Account of the Victories which Terminated in the Surrender of the Capital; with the Official Despatches of the Generals. To which is Added, the Treaty of Peace, and Valuable Tables of the Strength and Losses of the United States Army (Google eBook)

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A.S. Barnes & Company, 1849 - Mexican War, 1846-1848 - 365 pages
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Page 333 - In order to designate the boundary line with due precision, upon authoritative maps, and to establish upon the ground landmarks which shall show the limits of both republics, as described in the present article, the two governments shall each appoint a commissioner and a surveyor, who, before the expiration of one year from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this treaty, shall meet at the port of San Diego, and proceed to run and mark the said boundary in its whole course to the mouth of...
Page 343 - President of the United States of America, have caused the said Treaty to be made public, to the end that the same and every clause and article thereof may be observed and fulfilled with good faith by the United States and the citizens thereof.
Page 334 - Diego and proceed to run and mark the said boundary in its whole course to the mouth of the Rio Bravo del Norte. They shall keep journals and make out plans of their operations; and the result agreed upon by them shall be deemed a part of this Treaty, and shall have the same force as if it were inserted therein.
Page 336 - ... security and redress demanded by their true spirit and intent, the Government of the United States will now and hereafter pass, without unnecessary delay, and always vigilantly enforce, such laws as the nature of the subject may require. And finally, the...
Page 341 - If unhappily any disagreement should hereafter arise between the Governments of the two Republics, whether with respect to the interpretation of any stipulation in this treaty, or with respect to any other particular concerning the political or commercial relations of the two nations, the said Governments, in the name of those nations, do promise to each other that they will...
Page 336 - Mexico would be prejudicial in the extreme, it is solemnly agreed that all such incursions shall be forcibly restrained by the government of the United States whensoever this may be necessary ; and that when they cannot be prevented, they shall be punished by the said government, and satisfaction for the same shall be exacted all in the same way. and with equal diligence and energy, as if the same incursions were meditated or committed within its own territory against its own citizens.
Page 337 - ARTICLE XII. In consideration of the extension acquired by the boundaries of the United States, as defined in the fifth article of the present treaty, the government of the United States engages to pay to that of the Mexican Republic the sum of fifteen millions of dollars.
Page 341 - ... employments and shall not be molested in their persons nor shall their houses or goods be burnt or otherwise destroyed, nor their fields wasted by the armed force...
Page 18 - Said State to be formed, subject to the adjustment by this Government of all questions of boundary that may arise with other Governments ; and the Constitution thereof, with the proper evidence of its adoption by the people of said Republic of Texas, shall be transmitted to the President of the United States, to...
Page 333 - ... branch of the river Gila (or if it should not intersect any branch of that river, then to the point on the said line nearest to such branch, and thence in a direct line to the same) ; thence down the middle of the said branch and of the said river until it empties into the Rio Colorado ; thence across the Rio Colorado, following the division line between Upper and Lower California, to the Pacific Ocean.

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