Letters on the English nation, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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s.n., 1755 - Great Britain
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Page 245 - Never, lago. Like to the Pontic sea, Whose icy current and compulsive course Ne'er feels retiring ebb, but keeps due on To the Propontic and the Hellespont ; Even so my bloody thoughts, with violent pace, Shall ne'er look back, ne'er ebb to humble love. Till that a capable and wide revenge Swallow them up. — Now, by yond marble heaven, In the due reverence of a sacred vow {Kneels, I here engage my words.
Page 242 - Villain, be sure thou prove my love a whore, — Be sure of it; give me the ocular proof; Or, by the worth of mine eternal soul, Thou hadst been better have been born a dog Than answer my wak'd wrath ! lago.
Page 241 - I had been happy, if the general camp, Pioneers and all, had tasted her sweet body, So I had nothing known...
Page 245 - O, that the slave had forty thousand lives ! One is too poor, too weak for my revenge. Now do I see 'tis true. Look here, lago ; All my fond love thus do I blow to heaven : 'Tis gone. Arise, black vengeance, from thy hollow cell ! Yield up, O love, thy crown and hearted throne To tyrannous hate ! Swell, bosom, with thy fraught, For 'tis of aspics
Page 241 - That make ambition virtue ! O, farewell ! Farewell the neighing steed, and the shrill trump, The spirit-stirring drum, th' ear-piercing fife, The royal banner; and all quality, Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war! And O you mortal engines, whose rude throats Th' immortal Jove's dread clamours counterfeit, Farewell ! Othello's occupation's gone ! logo.
Page 73 - ... of discovering the perpetual motion. During a period of thirty years, he never went abroad but once, which was when he was obliged to take the oath of allegiance to King George the First ; this was also the only time he changed his shirt and clothes, or shaved himself, during the whole time of his retirement.
Page 293 - O, look upon me, sir, And hold your hands in benediction o'er me: No, sir, you must not kneel. Lear. Pray, do not mock me : I am a very foolish fond old man, Fourscore and upward, not an hour more nor less; And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind.
Page 286 - Train together; Degenerate Viper, I'll not stay with Thee! I yet have left a Daughter. Serpent, Monster! Lessen my Train and call 'em riotous?
Page 238 - Dangerous conceits are, in their natures, poisons, Which at the first are scarce found to distaste, But, with a little act upon the blood, Burn like the mines of sulphur.
Page 294 - Push, push the Battle, and the Day's our own. Their Ranks are broke, down with Albany. Who holds my Hands? O thou deceiving Sleep, I was this very Minute on the Chace; And now a Prisoner here. — What mean the Slaves? You will not murder me? CORD. Help, Earth and Heaven! For your Souls sake, dear Sirs, and for the Gods.

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