The Cambridge History of Africa, Volume 6

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J. D. Fage, Roland Oliver, Roland Anthony Oliver, G. N. Sanderson
Cambridge University Press, 1985 - History - 956 pages
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Volume VI of The Cambridge History of Africa covers the period 1870-1905, when the European powers (Britain, France, Germany, Portugal and Italy) divided the continent into colonial territories and vied with each other for control over vast tracts of land and valuable mineral resources. At the same time, it was a period during which much of Africa still had a history of its own. Colonial governments were very weak and could exist only by playing a large part both in opening up the continent to outside influences and in building larger political unities. The volume begins with a survey of the whole of Africa on the eve of the paper partition, and continues with nine regional surveys of events as they occured on the ground. Only in northern and southern Africa did these develop into classical colonial forms, with basis of outright conquest. Elsewhere, compromises emerged and most Africans were able to pursue the politics of survival. Partition was a process, not an event. The process was essentially one of modernisation in the face of outside challenge.
  

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Contents

Introduction i
1
Africa on the eve of partition
10
B South of the equator
61
SwahiliArabs
70
Origins
96
North Africa 15 9
159
Tunisia
171
Morocco
187
Southern and Central Africa 18861910
422
The colonial presence north of
448
Republic
472
The construction of the modern South
481
Portuguese colonies and Madagascar
493
B Madagascar and France 18701905
521
insurrection 189496 5 29
529
East Africa 18701905
539

The Saharan regions
204
From Sierra Leone to the Bandama
222
From the Volta to the Niger
231
From the upper Niger to the upper
238
From the upper Senegal to the middle
245
Western Africa 18861905
257
Western Equatorial Africa
298
B King Leopolds Congo 18861908
315
Vansina
327
Southern Africa 18671886
359
system 55
550
Towards a climax of Western penetration
561
The initial colonial experience
567
Subimperialism and colonial hierarchies
579
Towards a colonial economy 5 8 5
587
The European scramble and conquest
680
Bibliographical essays
767
Bibliography
824
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About the author (1985)

Oliver is Professor Emeritus of the history of Africa at the University of London and a fellow of the British academy.

Born in Srinagar, Kashmir, the son of a British army major and his wife, Roland Anthony Oliver has been recognized as the leading British historian of Africa. Educated at Stowe and King's College, Cambridge University, he served in the Foreign Office from 1942 to 1945, at which time he left to complete his graduate studies at Cambridge on a R. V. Smith research studentship. In 1948 he became lecturer at the University of London School of Oriental and African Studies, a position he held until 1958, when he became reader in African History. In 1964 he was appointed the first professor of the history of Africa at the University of London, where he remained until his retirement in 1986. Oliver's long tenure at the University of London and his numerous publications made him one of the leading academic protagonists for the study of the African past both in the United Kingdom and internationally. A whole generation of American, European, and African students passed through the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London under his tutelage, strongly influenced by him. Professionally very active and the principal academic spokesman for the study of African history, he received numerous honors, including Francqui professor at the University of Brussels and visiting professor at Northwestern and Harvard universities. Among his many publications is A Short History of Africa, which he co-authored with J.D. Fage in 1962 and which has probably been the most widely used text in schools and universities. His most massive contribution, however, was the general editorship of the eight-volume Cambridge History of Africa (1975-86). He shared the editorship with J. D. Fage, with whom he also edited for many years The Journal of African History, the leading journal in the field and by far the most influential in shaping African historiography.

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