The Famous Historie of Fryer Bacon, Volumes 1-2 (Google eBook)

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Edmund Goldsmid
Goldsmid, 1886
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Page 45 - For we can give such figures to transparent bodies, and dispose them in such order with respect to the eye and the objects, that the rays shall be refracted and bent towards any place we please ; so that we shall see the object near at hand, or at a distance under any angle we please. And thus from an incredible distance we may read the smallest letters, and may number the smallest particles of dust and sand...
Page 25 - England, bethought himselfe how he might keepe it hereafter from the like conquests, and so make himselfe famous hereafter to all posterities. This (after great study) hee found could be no way so well done as one; which was to make a head of brasse, and if he could make this head to speake (and heare it when it speakes) then might hee be able to wall all England about with brasse.
Page 5 - THE FAMOUS HISTORIE OF FRYER BACON, containing the wonderfull things that he did in his life : also the manner of his death, with the lives and deaths of the two conjurers, Bungye and Vandermast.
Page 17 - ... deserved a greater penance then one dayes fast in a whole weeke: his maister commended him for it, and bid him take heed that he did not...
Page 25 - ... from perfection of the worke as they were before, for they knew not how to give those parts that they had made motion, without which it was impossible that it should speake : many bookes they read, but yet could not...
Page 27 - Brasen head would speake: thus watched they for three weekes without any rest, so that they were so weary and sleepy, that they could not any longer...
Page 10 - ... likely to prove a very great clerke : hereat old Bacon was not well pleased (for he desired to bring him up to plough and to the cart, as hee himselfe was brought)) yet he for reverence sake to the priest, shewed not his anger, but kindly thanked him for his paines and counsell, yet desired him not to speake any more concerning that matter ; for hee knew best what best pleased himselfe, and that he would doe : so broke they off their talke, and parted. So soone as the old man came...
Page 26 - ... if they heard it not before it had done speaking all their labour should be lost ; they, being satisfied, licensed the spirit for to depart. " Then went these two learned...
Page 28 - ... spoken of, they both fell againe to their coniurations : first, Bungye did rayse Achilles with his Greekes, who marched about Vandermast and threatned him. Then Vandermast raised Hector with his Troians, who defended him from Achilles and the Greekes. Then began there a great battell between the Greekes and Troians, which continued a good space : at last Hector was slaine, and the Troians fled. Then did follow a great tempest, with thundring and lightning, so that the two coniurers wished that...
Page 34 - ... unspeakable force, without any living creature to stirre them. Likewise, an instrument may be made to fly withall, if one sit in the midst of the instrument, and doe turne an engine, by which the wings being artificially composed, may beat the ayre after the manner of a flying bird.

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