William Shakespeare: A Textual Companion

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Stanley Wells, Gary Taylor
W. W. Norton & Company, 1997 - Drama - 671 pages
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A comprehensive reference work on Shakespearean textual problems, setting forth the editorial principles of the Oxford Edition and providing a concise history of Shakespeare editing. Includes for each play, textual notes, press-variants, discussions of emendations and plausible alternative readings, and much more. Indispensable for serious students. Illus.
  

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Contents

THE CANON AND CHRONOLOGY OF SHAKESPEARES PLAYS
69
SUMMARY OF CONTROLTEXTS
145
WORKS CITED
158
The First Part of the Contention 2 Henry VI
175
Richard Duke of York 3 Henry VI
197
Henry VI
217
Venus and Adonis
264
A Midsummer Nights Dream
279
Sonnets and A Lovers Complaint
444
Sir Thomas More
461
Othello
476
Alls Wett That Ends Well
492
King Lear
509
The Tragedy of King Lear Polio
529
Macbeth
543
Pericles
556

Richard II
306
The Merchant of Venice
323
The Merry Wives of Windsor
340
Much Ado About Nothing
371
Julius Caesar
386
Twelfth Night
421
Coriolanus
593
The Tempest
612
The Two Noble Kinsmen
625
INDEX TO NOTES ON MODERNIZATION
666
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Stanley Wells is Emeritus Professor of Shakespeare Studies at the University of Birmingham. The Chairman of the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and Vice-Chairman of the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, he is the General Editor of the Oxford Shakespeare series and the Oxford Complete Works. A world-renowned
authority, he regularly appears on TV, radio, and in the press whenever Shakespeare is discussed.

About the Author:
Gary Taylor is Associate Professor of English Literature at Brandeis University. He is a joint general editor of Oxford's Shakespeare: Complete Works, co-author of William Shakespeare: A Textual Companion and The Division of the Kingdoms: Shakespeare's Two Versions of "King Lear," and author of To
Analyze Delight: A Hedonist Criticism of Shakespeare.

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