The Place of Houses

Front Cover
University of California Press, 1974 - Architecture - 306 pages
2 Reviews
With a new epilogue

Richly illustrated with houses large and small, old and new, with photographs, plans, and cutaway drawings, this is a book for people who want a house but who may not know what they really need, or what they have a right to expect.

The authors establish the basis for good building by examining houses in the small Massachusetts town of Edgartown; in Santa Barbara, California, where a commitment was made to re-create an imaginary Spanish past; and in Sea Ranch, on the northern California coast, where the authors attempt to create a community. These examples demonstrate how individual houses can express the care, energies, and dreams of the people who live in them, and can contribute to a larger sense of place.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Place of Houses

User Review  - Yoni - Goodreads

Architecture buff or not, you'll learn a lot about what people need in a home environment, and might realize what's important to you. I read the book as part of an intro to architecture course. It changed the way I think about and interact with my living space. Read full review

Review: The Place of Houses

User Review  - Ethan - Goodreads

I'm not sure if this would be considered theory, but if so, it is a great example of excellent theory written by an excellent architect. Above all, I think my favorite part of this book is when they ... Read full review

Contents

Foreword vn Setting out choices
147
Houses in several places Including the machines
176
Fitting the house to the land
188
Santa Barbara 19 Inflecting the scheme
207
The place of houses 49 Collecting
225
Ours 50
241
The three orders Inhabiting
269
The order of dreams 124 Index
303
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1974)

Charles Moore (1925-94) was Dean of the School of Architecture at Yale, Chair of the Department of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Los Angeles, and O'Neil Ford Professor of Architecture at the University of Texas. Donlyn Lyndon, Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, has served as Chair of the Departments of Architecture at Berkeley, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Oregon. Gerald Allen was an editor of Architectural Record when this book was written; he now practices architecture in New York. All three authors have designed noteworthy houses.

Bibliographic information