Gertrude Stein, Writer and Thinker (Google eBook)

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LIT Verlag Münster, 2000 - Literary Criticism - 393 pages
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"This study offers a guided commentary on the about and the "literariness" of her works which helps the reader to understand and appreciate her writing and thinking. Exploring Stein's figures of thought within the context of the philosophies of William James and A. N. Whitehead and considering the aesthetic and ethical significance of texts of all phases and genres of her writing, this commentary convinces us that Stein was indeed one of the 20th century's most original and complex authors."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  

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Contents

III
33
IV
37
V
48
VI
57
VIII
75
IX
96
X
107
XI
114
XX
191
XXI
194
XXII
214
XXIII
227
XXV
233
XXVI
247
XXVII
259
XXVIII
265

XII
119
XIII
130
XIV
134
XV
150
XVII
158
XVIII
179
XIX
182
XXXI
282
XXXII
292
XXXIII
307
XXXIV
319
XXXV
337
XXXVI
389
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Page 71 - The only way of expressing emotion in the form of art is by finding an "objective correlative"; in other words, a set of objects, a situation, a chain of events which shall be the formula of that particular emotion; such that when the external facts, which must terminate in sensory experience, are given, the emotion is immediately evoked.
Page 60 - To burn always with this hard, gemlike flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life. In a sense it might even be said that our failure is to form habits: for, after all, habit is relative to a stereotyped world, and meantime it is only the roughness of the eye that makes any two persons, things, situations, seem alike.
Page 53 - ... the knower is not simply a mirror floating with no foot-hold anywhere, and passively reflecting an order that he comes upon and finds simply existing. The knower is an actor, and coefficient of the truth on one side, whilst on the other he registers the truth which he helps to create. Mental interests, hypotheses, postulates, so far as they are bases for human action — action which to a great extent transforms the world — help to make the truth which they declare. In other words, there belongs...
Page 65 - The one thing which we seek with insatiable desire is to forget ourselves, to be surprised out of our propriety, to lose our sempiternal memory and to do something without knowing how or why; in short to draw a new circle.
Page 51 - The only obligation to which in advance we may hold a novel without incurring the accusation of being arbitrary, is that it be interesting.

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