The New England Magazine, Volume 14 (Google eBook)

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New England Magazine Company, 1896 - New England
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Page 125 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers...
Page 16 - I CHATTER over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow. I chatter, chatter, as I flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.
Page 703 - It is therefore ordered, That every township in this jurisdiction, after the Lord hath increased them to the number of fifty householders, shall then forthwith appoint one within their town to teach all such children as shall resort to him to write and read...
Page 683 - Parties, the Officers of the American Army do hereby in the most Solemn Manner associate, constitute, and combine themselves into one Society of Friends, to endure as long as they shall endure or any of their Eldest Male Posterity, and in failure thereof the collateral Branches, who may be judged worthy of becoming its Supporters and Members.
Page 126 - For mankind are one in spirit, and an instinct bears along, round the earth's electric circle, the swift flash of right or wrong; whether conscious or unconscious, yet humanity's vast frame through its ocean-sundered fibers feels the gush of joy or shame; in the gain or loss of one race all the rest have equal claim.
Page 684 - The Society shall have an ORDER by which its Members shall be known and distinguished, which shall be a Medal of Gold, of a proper Size to receive the Emblems, and suspended by a deep blue Ribbon, two Inches wide, edged with White, descriptive of the Union of America and France...
Page 514 - ... the history of the human race, viewed as a whole, may be regarded as the realization of a hidden plan of nature to bring about a political constitution, internally, and, for this purpose, also externally perfect, as the only state in which all the capacities implanted by her in mankind can be fully developed...
Page 703 - That the selectmen of every town in the several precincts and quarters where they dwell, shall have a vigilant eye over their brethren and neighbors, to see, first, that none of them shall suffer so much barbarism in any of their families, as not to endeavor to teach by themselves or others, their children and apprentices so much learning, as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue...
Page 196 - Towards the preservation of your government, and the permanency of your present happy state, it is requisite, not only that you steadily discountenance irregular oppositions to its acknowledged authority, but also that you resist with care the spirit of innovation upon its principles however specious the pretexts.
Page 708 - History, by apprising them of the past, will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify them as judges of the actions and designs of men...

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