Practical Dairy Bacteriology: Prepared for the Use of Students, Dairymen, and All Interested in the Problems of the Relation of Milk to Public Health (Google eBook)

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O. Judd Company, 1907 - Bacteriology, Agricultural - 314 pages
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Page 176 - The number of bacteria which may accumulate before milk becomes noticeably harmful to the average infant in summer, differs with the nature of the bacteria present, the age of the milk, and the temperature at which it has been kept. When milk is taken raw, the fewer the bacteria present the better are the results.
Page 86 - ... 1. Pathogenic bacteria (typhoid, scarlet fever, diphtheria, etc.). " 2. Contained poisons of chemical or bacterial origin. "DISEASE GERMS IN MILK (9). " There is a widespread feeling that the bacteria in milk are closely associated with the distribution of diseases. This idea is undoubtedly well founded, but in the minds of most people it is too indefinite to have much meaning, and Its very indefiniteness gives rise to erroneous impressions. The simple fact that milk contains bacteria does not...
Page 171 - Inspection of the dairies will undoubtedly reduce the danger of disease germs getting into milk ; but recognizing the wide occurrence of bovine tuberculosis, the difficulty of detecting it and the fact that the cows may have this disease in the udder unsuspected ; recognizing, too, that cases of walking typhoid fever are possible, unsuspected by the patient or his friends, it will be seen that no kind of dairy inspection, no matter how rigid, can free the milk from the possibility of disease germs....
Page 171 - This method is by treating the qjilk to a heat sufficient for pasteurization. Inspection of the dairies will undoubtedly reduce the danger of disease germs getting into the milk ; but recognizing the wide occurrence of bovine tuberculosis, the difficulty of detecting it and the fact that the cows may have this disease in the udder...
Page 86 - ... contain them, sometimes, in equal quantity. The fact that these beverages, with such enormous numbers of bacteria. are perfectly healthful and wholesome, is a clear indication that the simple presence of bacteria in milk is not the fact which renders it suspicious or in any degree less wholesome. Indeed, buttermilk is frequently recommended as a diet because it contains such large numbers of bacteria. It clearly follows that the impression with many people have that large numbers of bacteria...
Page 87 - The accumulated information of the last 20 years has shown us that four specific diseases are commonly thus distributed, together with a fifth type of disease which is less definite. The specific diseases are tuberculosis, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, and diphtheria, and the less definite type includes the diarrheal troubles known commonly by the name of cholera infantum. summer complaint, infantile diarrhea, etc. These are all characterized by diarrheal disturbances, but with such varying symptoms...
Page 86 - ... already noticed, it is perfectly clear that buttermilk and sour milk will contain bacteria in enormous numbers. Buttermilk may frequently contain as many as 500,000,000 bacteria per cc, and sour milk will contain them, sometimes, in equal quantity. The fact that these beverages, with such enormous numbers of bacteria, are perfectly healthful and wholesome, is a clear indication that the simple presence of bacteria in milk is not the fact which renders it suspicious, or in any degree less wholesome.8...
Page 105 - There are within our reach at present no practical means by which we can examine milk and determine whether it contains the germs of any of these four diseases. " It is important to notice that the numbers of bacteria in milk have no relation whatsoever to its chance of distributing these four diseases. " The sources of infection from typhoid fever, diphtheria, scarlet...
Page 87 - ... Any attempt to determine the healthfulness of milk based upon the number of bacteria which it contains, is, therefore, fallacious. " If the simple presence of bacteria in great numbers does not make milk dangerous, it must be that certain kinds of bacteria are harmful, while others are harmless (9). To understand the relation of milk bacteria to health, therefore, it is necessary to examine more closely the question of the kinds of disease germs liable to be in milk. The accumulated information...
Page 87 - It clearly follows that the impression with many people have that large numbers of bacteria render milk dangerous is a mistaken one. Any attempt to determine the healthfulness of milk based upon the number of bacteria which it contains, is, therefore, fallacious. " If the simple presence of bacteria in great numbers does not make milk dangerous, it must be that certain kinds of bacteria are harmful, while others are harmless (9). To understand the relation of milk bacteria to health, therefore, it...

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