The Black Tulip (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
1 Review
Nearly eighteen months after the 1672 lynching of the Dutch Grand Pensionary in which Johan de Witt and his brother Cornelis are killed, the city of Haarlem in the Netherlands is holding a competition between the country's best gardeners to grow a black tulip. Cornelius van Baerle, a young bourgeois gentleman has almost succeeded at the task, however before he can he is thrown into the Loevestein prison. While there he meets the beautiful young Rosa, a daughter of the prison guard, whom he falls in love with. "The Black Tulip", one of Dumas' shorter works is part brilliant political allegory, part romance, which revisits a fascinating time in Dutch history nearly thirty years after the famous "tulipmania."
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

A Grateful People
4
The Two Brothers
9
The Pupil of John de Witt
14
The Murderers
20
The Tulipfancier and his Neighbour
26
The Hatred of a Tulipfancier
30
The Happy Man makes Acquaintance with Misfortune
34
An Invasion
40
Rosas Lover
75
The Maid and the Flower
79
The Events which took place during those Eight Days
83
The Second Bulb
87
The Opening of the Flower
92
The Rival
96
The Black Tulip changes Masters
99
The President van Systens
102

The Family Cell
44
The Jailers Daughter
47
Cornelius van Baerles Will
50
The Execution
56
What was going on all this Time in the Mind of one of the Spectators
58
The Pigeons of Dort
61
The Little Grated Window
63
Master and Pupil
67
The First Bulb
71
A Member of the Horticultural Society
105
The Third Bulb
110
The Hymn of the Flowers
115
Wherein the Reader begins to guess the Kind of Execution that was awaiting Van Baerle
124
Haarlem
126
A Last Request
130
Conclusion
132
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2004)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

Bibliographic information