Dublin: A Cultural History

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2005 - History - 300 pages
0 Reviews
Europe's most westerly capital city was established by invaders and was for most of its history the locus of colonial administration, the engine room of foreign power, and a major site of indigenous resistance. From The Act of Union through nineteenth-century decline and into the early years of Irish independence it was a city identified with poverty, dirt, and decaying splendor. The Celtic Tiger (as Ireland's recent economic boom been called) produced sweeping changes, including massive new building projects, and the surprising revelation that Dublin has become fashionable. Siobh�n Kilfeather finds the legacy of the past undergoing a series of transformations in the vibrant atmosphere of contemporary Dublin.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Dubh LinnBaile Atha Cliath
15
From the Glorious Revolution
44
The Battle of Rathmines Monday
59
A Promenade on the South Side
71
From the Union to the Famine
105
Kilmainham
132
Dublin after the Famine
141
Parnell Square
188
The Capital since Independence
201
Never Get Old Culture and CounterCulture
229
An Abcdarium
245
Further Reading
273
Index of literary Historical Names
279
Index of Places
293
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Siobhan Kilfeather is at University of Sussex.

Bibliographic information