Facundo and the Construction of Argentine Culture (Google eBook)

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University of Texas Press, Jan 1, 2010 - Literary Criticism - 230 pages
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Domingo F. Sarmiento's classic 1845 essay Facundo, Civilizacion y Barbarie opened an inquiry into the nature of Argentinian culture that continues to the present day. In this elegantly written study, Diana Sorensen Goodrich explores the varied, and often conflicting, readings that Facundo has received since its publication and shows how these readings have contributed to the making and remaking of the Argentine nation and its culture.

Goodrich's analysis sheds new light on the intersection between canon formation and nation-building. While much has been written about Facundo as a primary text in Latin American letters, this is the first study that locates it within the problematics of canon formation and the cultural, social, and political contexts in which conflicting interpretations are constructed.

This new approach to Facundo illuminates the interactions among institutions, cultural ideologies, and political life. This book will be important reading for everyone interested in questions of national identity and the institutionalization of a national tradition.

  

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Contents

THE WARS OF PERSUASION Conflict Interpretation and Power in the Early Years of Facundos Reception
23
THE RISKS OF FICTION Facundo and the Parameters of Historical Writing
41
THE WILES OF DISPUTATION Alberdi Reads Facundo
67
FACUNDOS TRAVELS TO THE METROPOLITAN CENTERS
83
THE NATION CONSOLIDATED The 1880s and the Canonization of Facundo
99
A CLASSIC CORRECTED Rewriting the National Myths
142
NOTES
171
BIBLIOGRAPHY
195
INDEX
213
Copyright

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Page 14 - History is the subject of a structure whose site is not homogeneous, empty time, but time filled by the presence of the now...
Page 14 - For every image of the past that is not recognized by the present as one of its own concerns threatens to disappear irretrievably.
Page xi - There is no document of civilization which is not at the same time a document of barbarism...
Page 14 - We must be ready to receive every moment of discourse in its sudden irruption; in that punctuality in which it appears, and in that temporal dispersion that enables it to be repeated, known, forgotten, transformed, utterly erased, and hidden, far from all view, in the dust of books.
Page 30 - Sarup (1996) echoes this view by defining identity as "a multidimensional space in which a variety of writings blend and clash

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