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" First, that whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public affairs is not to be imputed to the king, nor is he answerable for it personally to his people... "
The British Herald; Or, Cabinet of Armorial Bearings of the Nobility ... - Page 43
by Thomas Robson - 1830
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 1

Sir William Blackstone - Law - 1791
...thing tranfaŁted by the government was of courfe juft and lawful, but means only two things. Firft, that whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public...affairs is not to be imputed to the king, nor is he anfwerable for it perfonally to his people : for this doŁtrine would totally deilroy that conftitutional...
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A Law grammar: or, An introduction to the theory and practice of English ...

Law - 1791 - 544 pages
...courfe jMii and lawful. It means only two tilings : FIRST, That whatever is exceptionable in the conducl of public affairs is not to be imputed to the king, nor is he anfwcrable for it perfonally to his people ; for this doftrine would totally deftroy that conftitutional...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 3

Sir William Blackstone - Law - 1793
...tranfa&ed by the government was of courfe juft and lawful, but means only two things. Firft, that whatevet is exceptionable in the conduct of public affairs is not to be imputed to the king, nor is he anfwerable for it perfonally to his people : for this do&rine would totally deitroy that constitutional...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 1

Sir William Blackstone, Edward Christian - Law - 1800
...thing tranfafted by the government was of courfe juft and lawful, but means only two things. Firft, that whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public...affairs is not to be imputed to the king, nor is he anfwerable for it perfonally to his people : for this doctrine would totally deftroy that conftitutional...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 1

Sir William Blackstone, Edward Christian - Law - 1800
...juft and lawful, but means only two things. Firft, that whatever is exceptionable in the conduŁt, of public affairs is not to be imputed to the king, nor is he anfwerable for it perfonally to his people : for this doctrine would totally deftroy that conftitutional...
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Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 1

Sir William Blackstone - Law - 1807
...no wrong. Which ancient and fundamental maxim is not to be understood, as if every thing transacted by the government was of course just and lawful, but means only two tilings. First, that whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public affairs is not to be imputed...
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Cobbett's Parliamentary Debates, During the ... Session of the ..., Volume 16

Great Britain. Parliament, William Cobbett - Great Britain - 1812
...wrong ; — which ancient and fundamental maxim is not to be understood, as if every thing transacted by the government was of course just and lawful, but...nor is he answerable for it personally to his people : for this doctrine would totally destroy that constitutional independence of the crown, which is necessary...
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Cobbett's Parliamentary Debates, During the ... Session of the ..., Volume 16

Great Britain. Parliament, William Cobbett - Great Britain - 1812
...wrong ; — which ancient and fundamental maxim is not to be understood, as if every thing transacted by the government was of course just and lawful, but...whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public affair« is not to be imputed tu the king; nor is he answerable for it personally to his people : for...
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The British Critic: A New Review, Volume 2

Theology - 1814
...him in a criminal way, much less to condemn him to punishment." (Comment, vol. I. p. 242.) -Again, " Whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public...is he answerable for it personally to his people." (Vol. I. p. 24-5.) We really beg pardon of our readers for quoting authorities in support of a doctrine,...
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The Kaleidoscope: or, Literary and scientific mirror

1825
...maxim we are not to understand, that every transaction of government is of course just and lawful; but that whatever is exceptionable in the conduct of public...is he answerable for it personally to his people; and farther, that the prerogative of the crown extends not to do any injury. It is created for the...
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