A history of the political life of the rt. hon. W. Pitt, by John Gifford (Google eBook)

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1809
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Page 401 - And whereas it hath been found by experience, that it is inconsistent with the safety and welfare of this Protestant kingdom, to be governed by a Popish prince...
Page 516 - ... to neutral places, but also from one place belonging to an enemy to another place belonging to an enemy, whether they be under the jurisdiction of one power or under several.
Page 401 - Commons, do further pray that it may be enacted, that all and every person and persons that is, are or shall be reconciled to or shall hold communion with the See or Church of Rome, or shall profess the popish religion, or shall marry a papist, shall be excluded and be for ever incapable to inherit, possess, or enjoy the crown and government of this realm...
Page 67 - That it is now necessary to declare, that to report any opinion, or pretended opinion of his Majesty upon any bill or other proceeding depending in either House of Parliament, with a view to influence the votes of the members, is a high crime and misdemeanour, derogatory to the honour of the Crown, a breach of the fundamental privileges of Parliament, and subversive of the Constitution of this country.
Page 517 - ... prepared for war by land or by sea, shall not be reputed contraband, much less such as have been already wrought and made up for any other use, all which shall be...
Page 517 - ... copper, brass, coals, as also wheat and barley, and any other kind of corn and pulse, tobacco, and likewise all manner of spices, salted and smoked flesh, salted fish, cheese and butter, beer...
Page 516 - Contracting parties, although the whole lading or any part thereof should appertain to the enemies of either, Contraband goods being always excepted. It is also agreed in like manner that the same liberty be extended to persons who are on board a free ship, with this effect that although they be enemies to both or either party, they are not to be taken out of that free Ship, unless they are officers or soldiers and in the actual service of the enemies...
Page 227 - Now if the country be not safe in such hands, in whose may it confide its interests ? If such a number of such men be liable to the influence of corrupt motives, what assembly of men will be secure from the same danger ? Does any new scheme of representation promise to collect together more wisdom, or to produce firmer integrity...
Page 504 - States, the merchants and others of each of the two nations residing in the dominions of the other shall have the privilege of remaining and continuing their trade, so long as they behave peaceably and commit no offence against the laws...
Page 513 - ... their ships in the ports of either the one or the other of the aforesaid parties, to sell what they have taken, or in any other manner whatsoever to exchange their ships...

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