Norfolk (Google eBook)

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University Press, 1909 - Norfolk (England) - 156 pages
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Page 23 - ... tops of the folds of the paper with a pair of shears. This has happened with the ancient beds forming parts of the earth's crust, and we therefore often find them tilted, with the upper parts removed. The other kinds of rocks are known as igneous rocks, which have been melted under the action of heat and become solid on cooling. When in the molten state they have been poured out at the surface as the lava of volcanoes, or have been forced into other rocks and cooled in the cracks and other places...
Page 24 - ... sands into sandstones, muds and clays into mudstones and shales, soft deposits of lime into limestone, and loose volcanic ashes into exceedingly hard rocks. They may also become cracked, and the cracks are often very regular, running in two directions at right angles one to the other. Such cracks are known as joints, and the joints are very important in affecting the physical geography of a district.
Page 10 - Waveney, on the south side; Cambridgeshire, parted by the river Ouse, and a small part of Lincolnshire, on the west. It extendeth full fifty miles from east to west; but from north to south stretcheth not above thirty miles. All England may be carved out of Norfolk, represented therein not only to the kind but degree thereof. Here are fens and heaths, and light and deep, and sand and clay ground, and meadows and pasture, and arable and woody, and (generally) woodless land; so grateful is this shire...
Page 114 - ... the reign of James I. It is a red-brick quadrangular building, with oriel windows and an ornamented entrance. The moat, which has been drained and converted into a garden, is spanned by a double-arched bridge. This house stands on the site of an early home of Queen Anne Boleyn. Hunstanton Hall, part of which was built during the latter part of the fifteenth century, is another fine moated house, with a splendid oak staircase. Several of its rooms 115 are unaltered since they were built, and they...
Page 121 - ... the town's end one passes over the river Waveney on a wooden bridge railed with timber, and so you enter into Norfolk. It is a low flat ground all hereabout, so that the least rains they are overflowed by the river and lie under water, as they did when I was there ; so that the road lay under water, which is very unsafe for strangers to pass, by reason of the holes and quicksands and loose bottom.
Page 133 - Gude faith, maun, ...if Coke send for me, I must gang to him as well as you.
Page 24 - ... horizontal. Rocks affected in this way are known as slates. If we could flatten out all the beds of England, and arrange them one over the other and bore a shaft through them, we should see them on the sides of the shaft, the newest appearing at the top and the oldest at the bottom, as in the annexed table. Such a shaft would have a depth of between 10,000 and 20,000 feet. The strata beds...
Page 93 - England, situate on the bank of a water and arm of the sea, which extended from thence to the main ocean, upon which ships, etc., have immemorially come to their market"; also that the city was a sea-port before the sand-bank on which Yarmouth was built had come into existence.
Page 29 - ... many trunks of trees, which were formerly supposed to mark the site of a buried forest ; but it is now known that they were floated to the places where they are found by some great river, which left them stranded on its shores or mud-banks. Mr FW Harmer, our chief authority on East Anglian geology, believes this river to have been the Rhine ; for at that time England was connected by land with the continent of Europe, and the Rhine probably flowed through a part of East Suffolk on its way to...
Page 60 - Head, and others, where they ride under shelter. The dangers of this place being thus considered, it is no wonder, that upon the shore beyond Yarmouth there are no less than four lighthouses kept flaming every night, besides the lights at Castor, north of the town, and at Goulston S., all...

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