American Passages: A History of the United States, Volume II: Since 1865, Volume 2

Front Cover
Cengage Learning, Oct 22, 2008 - History - 640 pages
1 Review
With a unique attention to time as the defining nature of history, AMERICAN PASSAGES offers students a view of American history as a complete, compelling narrative. AMERICAN PASSAGES emphasizes the intertwined nature of three key characteristics of time sequence, simultaneity, and contingency. With clarity and purpose, the authors convey how events grow from other events, people's actions, and broad structural changes (sequence), how apparently disconnected events occurred in close chronological proximity to one another and were situated in larger, shared contexts (simultaneity), and how history suddenly pivoted because of events, personalities, and unexpected outcomes (contingency).
Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: American Passages: A History of the United States, Volume I: to 1877

User Review  - Raven Ivanov - Goodreads

Very interesting! Read full review

Contents

Preface
xxv
About the Authors
447
Reconstruction Its Rise and Fall 18651877
450
An Economy Transformed The Rise of Big Business 18771887
486
Urban Growth and Farm Protest 18871893
516
A Troubled Nation Expands Outward 18931901
544
Theodore Roosevelt and Progressive Reform 19011909
574
Progressivism at High Tide 19091914
606
The Second World War 19391945
758
Postwar America 19461952
790
The Eisenhower Years 19531960
816
The Turbulent Years 19601968
850
Crisis of Confidence 19691980
884
From Reagan to Clinton 19811995
918
A Conservative Nation in a Globalizing World 19952008
948
Appendix
977

Over There and Over Here The Impact of World War I 19141921
638
The Age of Jazz and Mass Culture 19211927
670
The Great Depression 19271933
698
The New Deal 19331939
726
Glossary
989
Index
1
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2008)

Edward L. Ayers is the President of the University of Richmond. He was educated at the University of Tennessee and Yale University, where he received his Ph.D. in American Studies. Previously Dean of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia, where he began teaching in 1980, Ayers was named National Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation and the Council for the Support of Education in 2003. His book, IN THE PRESENCE OF MINE ENEMIES: WAR IN THE HEART OF AMERICA, 1859-1863 (2003), won the Bancroft Prize for distinguished work on the history of the United States. THE PROMISE OF THE NEW SOUTH: LIFE AFTER RECONSTRUCTION (1992) won prizes for the best book on the history of American race relations and on the history of the American South. It was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He is the co-editor of THE OXFORD BOOK OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH (1997) and ALL OVER THE MAP: RETHINKING AMERICAN REGIONS (1996). The World Wide Web version of "The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War" was recognized by the American Historical Association as the best aid to the teaching of history. His latest book is WHAT CAUSED THE CIVIL WAR? REFLECTIONS ON THE SOUTH AND SOUTHERN HISTORY (2005).

Lewis L. Gould is Eugene C. Barker Centennial Professor Emeritus in American History at the University of Texas at Austin. After receiving his Ph.D. from Yale University, he taught at Texas for 31 years before his retirement in 1998. He was honored for outstanding undergraduate and graduate teaching during his career. His most recent books include THE MODERN AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (2003), GRAND OLD PARTY: A HISTORY OF THE REPUBLICANS (2003), and THE MOST EXCLUSIVE CLUB: A HISTORY OF THE MODERN UNITED STATES SENATE (2005). He has written op-ed essays for "The Washington Post," the "Austin American-Statesman," and "The Dallas Morning News," and has been a frequent commentator on radio and television about modern politics, First Ladies, and Congress.

He is also an associate editor of the American National Biography. Oshinsky writes about the brutality of penitentiary life in his book, Worse Than Slavery: Parchman Farm and the Ordeal of Jim Crow Justice. He earned a Senior Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities and an appointment as Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Texas, Austin for his work on the penitentiary project. Oshinsky also received the 17th Annual Robert F. Kennedy Book Award for his novel.

Jean R. Soderlund is Professor of History and Deputy Provost for Faculty Affairs at Lehigh University. She received her Ph.D. from Temple University and was a post-doctoral fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Her book, QUAKERS AND SLAVERY: A DIVIDED SPIRIT, won the Alfred E. Driscoll Publication Prize of the New Jersey Historical Commission. Soderlund was an editor of three volumes of the PAPERS OF WILLIAM PENN (1981-1983) and co-authored FREEDOM BY DEGREES: EMANCIPATION IN PENNSYLVANIA AND ITS AFTERMATH (1991). She has written articles and chapters in books on the history of women, African Americans, Native Americans, Quakers, and the development of abolition in the British North American colonies and early United States. She is currently working on a study of the Lenape people within colonial New Jersey society. She is a council member of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, and she served as a committee chair for the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians.

Bibliographic information