The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cato Institute, 2009 - History - 302 pages
16 Reviews
The Founding Fathers wanted the judicial branch to serve as a check on the power of the legislative and executive, and gave the Supreme Court the responsibility of interpreting the Constitution in a way that would safeguard individual freedoms. Sadly, the Supreme Court has handed down many destructive decisions on cases you probably never learned about in school. In The Dirty Dozen, two distinguished legal scholars shed light on the twelve worst cases, which allowed government to interfere in your private contractual agreements; curtail your rights to criticize or support political candidates; arrest and imprison you indefinitely, without filing charges; seize your private property, without compensation, when someone uses the property for criminal activity--even if you don't know about it!
  

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Review: The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom

User Review  - Eric - Goodreads

Fascinating! There is a reason this is a "libertarian" read -- its about the US Constitution. The SCOTUS reasoning made for each case is scant compared to the overwhelming and well documented reasoning disputing the constitutionality of the resulting decisions. Read full review

Review: The Dirty Dozen: How Twelve Supreme Court Cases Radically Expanded Government and Eroded Freedom

User Review  - Sean Rosenthal - Goodreads

Interesting Quotes: "[T]wo federal government agencies recently examined gun controls and found no statistically significant evidence to support their effectiveness. In 2004 the National Academy of ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

1 Introduction
1
THEORY
11
2 Freedom Properly Understood
13
3 Myths of Individualism
33
4 Saving Rights Theory from Its Friends
41
Framing the Problem of Justice
85
6 G A Cohen on SelfOwnership Property and Equality
129
7 Twenty Myths about Markets
155
Government Planning for Tomorrow
389
19 Against Taxes
393
20 Hothouse of Hate
397
You May Already Be a Winner
401
22 The Egyptian Judiciary Blazing the Path to Democracy and Economic Development
405
23 The Crime of Blogging in Egypt
409
24 Six Facts about Iraq
411
25 Moscows Pride and Prejudice
417

8 Whats Not Wrong with Libertarianism
183
9 The Role of Institutions and Law in Economic Development
205
HISTORY
219
10 Classical Liberalism and Civil Society
221
The Classical Liberal Theory of Class Conflict
255
12 The Great Bequest
277
13 The Millennial Struggle for Liberty
287
14 Why Socialism Collapsed in Eastern Europe
289
PRACTICE
297
Group Representation Group Rights and Constitutionalism
299
Homogeneity Diversity Identity Liberty
349
Public or Private?
379
26 Challenges of Democratization
419
BOOKS AND IDEAS
423
27 The Literature of Liberty
425
28 With Friends Like This
477
29 The Elitist as Egalitarian
483
30 On Nationality
493
31 Libertarianism in the Crosshairs
499
The Strange Philosophy of a Left Libertarian
509
33 Liberal Flagship Turns 70 Burning the Midnight Oil
515
Index
519
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Levy is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. He is also an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, a director of the Institute for Justice, and a member of the Board of Visitors of the Federalist Society. He holds a Ph.D. from American University Law School.

William Mellor is the president and general counsel of the Institute for Justice. He litigates constitutional cases involving economic liberty, property rights, school choice, and free speech. He lives in Falls Church, Virginia.

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