Cicero, XXIII, Letters to Atticus

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Harvard University Press, Feb 17, 1999 - Biography & Autobiography - 352 pages
4 Reviews
In letters to his dear friend Atticus, Cicero reveals himself as to no other of his correspondents except, perhaps, his brother. These letters, in this four-volume series, also provide a vivid picture of a momentous period in Roman history--years marked by the rise of Julius Caesar and the downfall of the Republic.When the correspondence begins in November 68 BCE the 38-year-old Cicero is a notable figure in Rome: a brilliant lawyer and orator, who has achieved primacy at the Roman bar and a political career that would culminate in the Consulship in 63. Over the next twenty-four years--to November 44, a year before he was put to death by the forces of Octavian and Mark Antony--Cicero wrote frequently to his friend and confidant, sharing news and discussing affairs of business and state. It is to this corpus of over 400 letters that we owe most of our information about Cicero's literary activity. And taken as a whole the letters provide a first-hand account of social and political life in Rome.

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Review: Letters to Atticus vol. 1

User Review  - Dimitris Lioutas - Goodreads

A superb translation from a much better classicist. One of the best editions of Cicero's epistolography out there, covering one of the most agitaded periods of roman history. Recommended as an excellent source for Roman history scholars. Read full review

Review: Letters to Atticus vol. 1

User Review  - Vicki Cline - Goodreads

This is a collection of letters from Cicero to his good friend Atticus, running from November 68 BC to July 1, 54 BC. I was hoping for more about the Catilina affair, but there were many letters ... Read full review

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About the author (1999)

Born in Arpinum on January 3, 106 B.C., Marcus Tullius Cicero was a Roman orator, writer, and politician. In Rome, Cicero studied law, oratory, philosophy, and literature, before embarking on a political career. Banished from Rome in 59 B.C. for the execution of some members of the Catiline group, Cicero devoted himself to literature. Cicero was pardoned by Julius Caesar in 47 B.C., and returned to Rome to deliver his famous speeches, known as the "Philippics," urging the senate to declare war on Marc Antony. Cicero's chief works, written between 46 and 44 B.C., can be classified in the categories of philosophical works, letters, and speeches. The letters, edited by his secretary Tiro, showcase a unique writing style and charm. The most popular work of the period was De Officiis, a manual of ethics, in which Cicero espoused fundamental Christian values half a century before Christ. Cicero was murdered in Formiae, Italy, on December 4, 43 B.C., by Antony's soldiers after the triumvirate of Antony, Lepidus, and Octavius was formed.

D. R. Shackleton Bailey was Pope Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Harvard University.

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