Shakespeare's history of King Henry the Fourth, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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Harper & brothers, 1894 - 210 pages
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Page 44 - I know you all, and will awhile uphold The unyoked humour of your idleness. Yet herein will I imitate the sun, Who doth permit the base contagious clouds To smother up his beauty from the world...
Page 72 - Should I turn upon the true prince ? Why, thou knowest I am as valiant as Hercules ; but beware instinct ; the lion will not touch the true prince.
Page 105 - Glittering in golden coats like images; As full of spirit as the month of May And gorgeous as the sun at midsummer; . Wanton as youthful goats, wild as young bulls.
Page 47 - Three times they breath'd, and three times did they drink, Upon agreement, of swift Severn's flood: Who then, affrighted with their bloody looks, Ran fearfully among the trembling reeds, And hid his crisp head in the hollow bank Blood-stained with these valiant combatants.
Page 44 - So when this loose behaviour I throw off, And pay the debt I never promised, By how much better than my word I am, By so much shall I falsify men's hopes...
Page 143 - Every thing that heard him play, Even the billows of the sea, Hung their heads, and then lay by. In sweet music is such art, Killing care and grief of heart Fall asleep, or hearing die.
Page 45 - My liege, I did deny no prisoners ; But, I remember, when the fight was done, When I was dry with rage, and extreme toil, Breathless and faint, leaning upon my sword, Came there a certain lord, neat, and trimly dress'd, Fresh as a bridegroom...
Page 27 - This happy breed of men, this little world, This precious stone set in the silver sea, Which serves it in the office of a wall, Or as a moat defensive to a house, Against the envy of less happier lands, This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England, This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings, Fear'd by their breed and famous by their birth...
Page 119 - Honour ? Air. A trim reckoning! Who hath it? He that died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel it ? No. Doth he hear it? No. Is it insensible then ? Yea, to the dead. But will it not live with the living ? No. Why ? Detraction will not suffer it : therefore I'll none of it: Honour is a mere 'scutcheon, and so ends my catechism.
Page 202 - I better brook the loss of brittle life Than those proud titles thou hast won of me ; They wound my thoughts worse than thy sword my flesh : But thought's the slave of life, and life time's fool; And time, that takes survey of all the world, Must have a stop.

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