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Books Books 1 - 10 of 39 on Every living language, like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is in perpetual....  
" Every living language, like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is in perpetual motion and alteration ; some words go off, and become obsolete ; others are taken in, and by degrees grow into common use ; or the same word is inverted to a new sense... "
The Works of Richard Bentley - Page 1
by Richard Bentley, Sir Isaac Newton - 1836
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De Quincey's Writings, Volume 14

Thomas De Quincey - 1853
...expresses himself in a more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. ' Every living language,' says he, ' like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.' Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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Essays on Philosophical Writers and Other Men of Letters, Volume 2

Thomas De Quincey - 1854
...expresses himself in a more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. ' Every living language,' says he, ' like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.' Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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Indigenous Races of the Earth: Or, New Chapters of Ethnological ..., Volume 1

Louis-Ferdinand-Alfred Maury, Ferencz Aurelius Pulszky, James Aitken Meigs - Acclimation - 1857 - 632 pages
...obsolete ; others are taken in, and by degrees grow into common use; or the same word is inverted in a new sense and notion, which in tract of time makes...their own native tongues, where continual use makes a man a critic." But, at the same time that this is the law deduced from the historical evidences of...
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De Quincey's works

Thomas De Quincey - 1858
...out in Chatterton. more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. " Every living language," says he, " like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face." Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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Writings, Volume 14

Thomas De Quincey - 1865
...expresses himself in a more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. ' Every living language,' says he, ' like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.' Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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The Works of Thomas De Quincey: Richard Bentley and other writings

Thomas De Quincey - 1863
...out in Chatterton. more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. " Every living language," says he, " like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face." Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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Judas Iscariot and other writings

Thomas De Quincey - 1863 - 333 pages
...out in Chatterton. more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. " Every living language," says he, " like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face." Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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Richard Bentley and other writings

Thomas De Quincey - 1863
...out in Chatterton. more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. " Every living language," says he, " like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face." Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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The Works of Thomas De Quincey: Richard Bentley and other writings

Thomas De Quincey - 1863
...out in Chatterton. more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. " Every living language," says he, " like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face." Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
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Writings, Volume 14

Thomas De Quincey - 1865
...expresses himself in a more philosophic tone than he usually adopts. ' Every living language,' says he, ' like the perspiring bodies of living creatures, is...language, as age makes in the lines and mien of a face.' Boyle, however, admitting this as a general law, chooses to suppose that the Greek language presented...
Full view - About this book




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