Information Modeling the EXPRESS Way (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Dec 14, 1993 - Mathematics - 416 pages
0 Reviews
Information modeling technology--the open representation of information for database and other computing applications--has grown significantly in recent years as the need for universal systems of information coding has steadily increased. EXPRESS is a particularly successful ISO International Standard language family for object-flavored information modeling. This cogent introduction to EXPRESS provides numerous, detailed examples of the language family's applicability to a diverse range of endeavors, including mechanical engineering, petroleum exploration, stock exchange asset management, and the human genome project. The book also examines the history, practicalities, and implications of information modeling in general, and considers the vagaries of normal language that necessitate precise communication methods. This first-ever guide to information modeling and EXPRESS offers invaluable advice based on years of practical experience. It will be the introduction that students as well as information and data modeling professionals have been waiting for.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Answers to Exercises
177
References
179
122 The anatomy of a name
181
123 References in general
182
125 Type references
183
128 Function references
184
Answers to Exercises
185
Executable statements
187

241 EntityRelationship
18
242 EXPRESSG
19
243 IDEF1X
20
244 NIAM
21
245 OMT
22
246 ShlaerMellor
23
25 Lexical representations
24
252 EXPRESS
25
253 GEM
26
26 Graphical vs lexical representations
27
27 Exercises
28
28 Further reading
29
The modeling process
31
Basic objects
33
Relationships and attributes
35
Completion of constraints
36
Model integration
37
A worked example
39
412 Description
40
42 The base model
41
421 Categorization and specialization
42
422 Attributes
43
423 Uniqueness constraints
45
424 Local constraints
46
425 Existence constraints
47
426 Documentation
48
43 Relationships and attributes
50
432 Subtypes revisited
52
433 Redundancy elimination
54
434 Local constraints
56
435 Module structure
58
436 Refined model
59
44 Model completion
63
45 Exercises
65
46 Further reading
67
Modeling principles
68
52 Scoping
69
53 The nym principle
70
55 Implementation independence
72
551 Abstraction
73
57 Constraint
75
572 Constraint functions
77
58 Reality
78
59 Redundancy
79
5102 Implied correspondence
80
5103 Optional and default values
81
511 Hierarchies
82
512 Simple types
83
514 Further reading
85
Integration and specialization
86
62 Schema interfacing
89
63 Model integration
91
631 Cosmetic integration
92
633 Continuity integration
94
635 Core based integration
95
64 Subsets and specialization
96
642 Specialization
98
643 ASIM structure
99
65 Exercises
101
66 Further reading
103
Model documentation
104
72 Embedded style
105
73 Partitioned style
107
75 Exercises
111
EXPRESS information bases
113
82 The EXPRESS connection
115
83 The computer connection
116
832 Editor
117
836 Visualizer
118
The EXPRESS Language
121
Basic elements
127
92 The character set
128
93 Remark
130
94 Symbols
131
96 Identifiers
132
97 Literals
133
973 Real literal
134
975 Logical literal
135
977 Entity literal
136
Answers to Exercises
137
Datatypes
139
101 Pseudotypes
140
102 Simple datatypes
141
1022 Real datatype
142
1024 Logical datatype
143
1027 Binary datatype
144
103 Collection datatypes
145
1031 Array datatype
146
1032 Bag datatype
147
1034 Set datatype
148
104 Enumeration type
149
105 Select type
150
Answers to Exercises
151
Declarations
152
111 Schema
153
113 Type
154
114 Entity
156
1141 Attribute
157
1142 Local rule
162
1143 Supertypes and subtypes
165
1144 Interpreting supertype relationships
170
115 Algorithm
171
1152 Local variable
173
1154 Procedure
174
116 Rule
175
132 Alias statement
188
134 Case statement
189
135 Compound statement
190
137 Procedure call statement
191
1381 Increment control
193
1383 Until control
194
139 Return statement
195
Expressions
196
141 Numeric valued operations
197
142 Logical and boolean valued operations
198
1421 NOT operator
199
1425 Comparison
200
1426 Interval
202
1427 IN operator
203
1429 Subset operator
204
144 Aggregate valued operations
205
1443 Difference operator
206
145 Function call
207
Answers to Exercises
209
Interfacing
211
151 The interface specification
212
1511 Use
213
152 Multiple specifications
214
155 Subtype pruning
215
156 Independent existence
216
157 Putting it all together
217
EXPRESS Syntax
220
A graphical form of EXPRESS
235
171 Graphics requirements
236
174 Further reading
238
Symbols
239
1813 Entity symbol
240
182 Relationship symbols
241
183 Composition symbols
242
1832 Interschema references
244
EXPRESSG models
245
192 Entity level model
246
1922 Constraints
247
1924 Entity modeling
248
1925 Interschema references
250
1931 Complete models
251
Sample Models
253
The EXPRESSI Language
259
211 Governing principles
260
212 Basic values
262
2122 Strings
263
214 Select values
264
216 Entity values and representations
265
2161 Attribute values
266
2162 Supertypes and subtypes
267
217 Constant values
268
Usage notes
270
222 Abstract test cases
271
2232 Output
272
EXPRESSI Syntax
273
EXPRESS example model
280
A3 Authority schema
281
A31 Entity definitions
282
A32 Function and procedure definitions
284
A33 Entity classification structure
287
A42 Entity definitions Entity TRANSFER
289
A43 Function and procedure definitions
295
A44 Entity classification structure
297
A51 Type definitions Type MONTHS
298
A53 Function and procedure definitions Function VALID DATE
299
A54 Entity classification structure
301
Example model instance
302
B1 The authority schema instance
303
B2 The support schema instance
304
B3 The calendar schema instance
307
Interpreting supertype relationships
309
Relationships and cardinality
316
1
317
1
318
1
319
?
320
1
321
1
322
?
323
?
324
1
325
?
326
1
327
?
328
An EXPRESS Metamodel
330
E2 The metaEXPRESS Schema
331
E3 Support Schema
332
Resources
354
False
355
ACos
356
BLength
357
Exp
358
HiBound
359
Hilndex
360
Insert
361
Log Log2 Log1O
362
NVL
363
Remove
364
Sin
365
Sqrt
366
Usedin
367
Value
368
Bibliography
369
Index
381
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xxvii - When I use a word," Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, "it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less." "The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many different things.
Page 6 - Factual information (as measurements or statistics) used as a basis for reasoning, discussion, or calculation.
Page 5 - Examinations are formidable even to the best prepared ; for the greatest fool may ask more than the wisest man can answer.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1993)

Douglas A. Schenck is at McDonnell Douglas Corporation. Peter R. Wilson is at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Bibliographic information