My Life and Work (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Doubleday, Page, 1922 - Automobile industry and trade - 289 pages
23 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
9
4 stars
12
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: My Life And Work (The Autobiography Of Henry Ford)

User Review  - Vismay - Goodreads

I have read books by writers with fanciful imagination. Finally, I got time enough to read one by the author who has always captured people's fancy and imagination. His accomplishments have inspired ... Read full review

Review: My Life And Work (The Autobiography Of Henry Ford)

User Review  - Sourav Sen - Goodreads

Despite giving a good account of business ideas practiced by the great man, that enabled him to break barriers and achieve success, I still feel that the content could have been presented in a better ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
21
III
33
IV
47
V
64
VI
77
VII
91
VIII
103
XII
156
XIII
169
XIV
184
XV
195
XVI
206
XVII
222
XVIII
234
XIX
253

IX
116
X
131
XI
141

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 101 - I am sorry to say, wants a job in which he does not have to put forth much physical exertion— above all, he wants a job in which he does not have to think.
Page 264 - Who ought to be boss?" is like asking "Who ought to be the tenor in the quartet?
Page 76 - ... it is not the employer who pays wages. He only handles the money. It is the product that pays the wages and it is the management that arranges the production so that the product may pay the wages. The more economical methods of production did not begin all at once. They began gradually — just as we began gradually to make our own parts. "Model T" was the first motor that we made ourselves.
Page 144 - The more usual way is to take the costs and then determine the price, and although that method may be scientific in the narrow sense, it is not scientific in the broad sense, because what earthly use is it to know the cost if it tells you that you cannot manufacture at a price at which the article can be sold?
Page 81 - The man who places a part does not fasten it — the part may not be fully in place until after several operations later. The man who puts in a bolt does not put on the nut; the man who puts on the nut does not tighten it.
Page 217 - ... lower price so that all boys may have the advantage of reading and owning them. It is the only series of books published under the control of this great organization. whose sole object is the welfare and happiness of the boy himself. For the first time in history a guaranteed library is available, and at a price so low as to be within the reach of all.
Page 101 - It is terrifying to me. I could not possibly do the same thing day in and day out, but to other minds, perhaps I might say to the majority of minds, repetitive operations hold no terrors. In fact, to some types of mind thought is absolutely appalling. To them the ideal job is one where creative instinct need not be expressed.
Page 97 - But the vast majority of men want to stay put. They want to be led. They want to have everything done for them and to have no responsibility.
Page 108 - The length of time required to become proficient in the various occupations is about as follows: 43 per cent, of all the jobs require not over one day of training; 36 per cent, require from one day to one week; 6 per cent, require from one to two weeks; 14 per cent, require from one month to one year; one per cent, require from one to six years.
Page 45 - I had plenty of time, for I never left my business. I do not believe a man can ever leave his business. He ought to think of it by day and dream of it by night.

Bibliographic information