The Growth and Maintenance of Linguistic Complexity

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John Benjamins Publishing, 2004 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 333 pages
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This book studies linguistic complexity and the processes by which it arises and is maintained, focusing not so much on what one can say in a language as how it is said. Complexity is not seen as synonymous with difficulty but as an objective property of a system a measure of the amount of information needed to describe or reconstruct it. Grammatical complexity is the result of historical processes often subsumed under the rubric of grammaticalization and involves what can be called mature linguistic phenomena, that is, features that take time to develop. The nature and characteristics of such processes are discussed in detail, as well as the external and internal factors that favor or disfavor stability and change in language.
  

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Contents

CHAPTER 3
19
CHAPTER 4
57
CHAPTER 5
75
CHAPTER 6
103
CHAPTER 7
119
CHAPTER 8
157
CHAPTER 9
181
CHAPTER 10
209
CHAPTER 11
261
Do languages become more complex over time?
276
CHAPTER 12
289
Appendix A
297
List of abbrevations used in glosses
315
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