Diary of a Pilgrimage (and Six Essays) (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1891 - 360 pages
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Page 111 - A sparrow in the hand is better than a hawk in the air', or the German 'A sparrow in the hand is better than a pigeon on the roof.
Page 159 - Magdalen — it would be difficult to speak in terms of too high praise. Themselves mere peasants There are those two women again spying round our door ; I am sure of it!
Page 152 - Not only to the practice of all the industrial and liberal arts, but to that of the fine arts, the Exposition will have a bequest of the utmost value ; a bequest which could come from no source less exalted ; a bequest which, as regards the fine arts in especial, will ever be associated with...
Page 81 - Among all nations, there should be vast temples raised where the people might worship silence and listen» Diary 64 — »No vast wings flee from thence» Buchanan 187 — »In one vast cloud of flying green and gold
Page 349 - Yes; when a man is much above the average size and strength, we cut one of his legs or arms off, so as to make things more equal ; we lop him down a bit, as it were. Nature, you see, is somewhat behind the times; but we do what we can to put her straight.
Page 28 - One day she will arrive at perfect wisdom, and will pay each man according to his deserts. But do not be alarmed. This will not happen in our time. Turning round, while still musing about Society I ran against B. (literally). He thought I was a clumsy ass at first, and said so ; but, on recognizing me, apologized for his mistake.
Page 9 - ... the only bit of pleasure he hoped for from that trip. As it turned out, however, he had never had a more enjoyable holiday in his life before. The whole event was a tremendous success. And after that, he had made up his mind to always start on a Friday ; and he always did, and always had a good time. He said that he would never, upon any consideration, start for a trip upon any other day but a Friday now. It was so absurd, this superstition about Friday. So we agreed to start on the Friday, and...
Page 209 - Englishman. We English are always sneering at ourselves, and patriotism in England is regarded as a stamp of vulgarity. The Germans, on the other hand, believe in themselves, and respect themselves. The world for them is not played out. Their country to them is still the "Fatherland.
Page 178 - They seem to shed around them, from their bright, goodtempered faces, a healthy atmosphere of all that is homely and simple and good".
Page 267 - The lover sighing like a furnace" will not go on sighing like a furnace forever. That furnace will go out. He will become the husband, "full of strange oaths — jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel," and grow "into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon.

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