Change over time in children's literacy development

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Heinemann, Apr 18, 2001 - Education - 328 pages
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When early literacy interventions work with young, low-achieving children, just why they work is often poorly understood. With "Change Over Time," you can join Marie Clay as she takes a step back from the concepts of reading failure, disability, and dyslexia, and considers a new way to view literacy learning difficulties.

You begin by asking questions about the changes that occur in the cognitive processes of proficient children as they learn to read. You call what they do "constructive" and discover how you can interact daily with low-achieving children so that they too conduct literacy tasks constructively and independently. Then you consider some provocative alternatives: How do you describe children's progress? Do you check book levels off a list? Do you count the letters, the sounds, the correct spellings? Or is there another option? What if you give prime attention to processing - how the brain works with the text to get the message? Are the children shifting from simple processing to more complex ways of working? Are they initiating more independent problem solving on harder texts and getting better at it day after day?

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Contents

Extra power from writing in early literacy interventions
11
A second chance to learn about early writing
17
Becoming aware of the construction of sentences
25
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Marie M. Clay started off her career as a teacher before going on to work at the New Zealand Ministry of Education in the Psychological Services Department. Some time later, Clay went to work for the University of Auckland, where for the next thirty years, she trained other psychologists for their jobs. Clay used her knowledge of normal and clinical aspects of developmental psychology to teach others as a visiting professor at the Ohio State University, University of Illinois, Texas Woman's University, Oxford University, and the Institute of Education at the University of London. President of the International Reading Association from 1992-1993, Clay still advocates a literary awareness program that urges teachers to think about literary betterment and the power of writing.

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