The Compleat Academic: A Practical Guide for the Beginning Social Scientist

Front Cover
Mark P. Zanna, John M. Darley
Psychology Press, 1987 - Psychology - 225 pages
0 Reviews
This volume is a collection of information about the concerns and problems of the beginning social scientist in the academic and nonacademic world. Covering topics from the senior graduate student's job search to the assistant professor's research and teaching experiences, this book serves as an official introduction to the "rules of the academic game."
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

The Hiring Process in Academia
3
Finding Possible Jobs
4
The Vita
5
Getting the Complete Record to the Hiring Institution
6
The Hiring System Such As It Is
7
The Talk That Gets Or Loses the Job
8
What to Talk About
9
Preparing Talk Details
10
A Philosophy of Teaching
111
References
112
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Research But Were Afraid to Ask Your Advisor
115
Literature Review
116
A Brief Aside About Word Processing
117
Design Problems
118
Piloting
119
The Experiment
122

What You Want to Know About the Place Where You Might Work
11
Information About the University
13
Things People Will Want To Know About You
14
Teaching
15
Your Host and Your Schedule
16
Social Events
17
Hearing Nothing and Hearing No
18
Its a Job You Really Want
19
Finishing
20
The PresentMethod Professor Controlling Ones Career
23
The Stressful First Years
24
Teaching Courses
25
Administrative Work
27
You Remember Research?
29
Staying on Top of the Field
30
Faculty Colleagues
31
Working with Students
33
Making Ends Meet
35
If You Are a Minority Group Member or a Woman
36
Hitting Your Stride
39
Or What Not To Publish
40
Writing
42
Getting Reviews
44
Providing Reviews
45
Time Management
47
Establishing Priorities
48
Organizational Aids
49
Scheduling a Day
50
Dealing With Hordes of Students
51
The Pile
52
Getting Time to Rest and Gain Perspective
53
Life Outside of Work
54
Your Personal Life
55
The Pleasures of Working
59
References
60
Power and Politics in Academic Departments
61
Where is the Power Anyway?
63
Power Concentrates Around Critical Dependencies
64
The External Basis for Organizational Power
66
Power in Use
68
The Role of Social Uncertainty
69
Grants and Power Between Universities
70
Managing Your Own Political Situation
72
Recognizing Your Importance in Your Organizations
73
Learning the Hard WayAfter the Fact
74
Learning the Easy WayFrom History
76
History as a Conversation Killer
77
Cultivating Your Value in a University
78
Cultivating Your Value Outside
80
Power in Scientific and Resource Networks
81
Creating Your Own Network
82
Politics and the Politic in Using Your Power
84
HANDLING CRITICAL ELEMENTS OF AN ASSISTANT PROFESSORSHIP
85
Tips On Teaching
87
Coming into a New Institution
88
Broadening Your Perspective
89
Now You Have a Syllabus What Next?
90
Lecturing
91
Attention
92
Organization of Lectures
93
The Introduction
94
Body of the Lecture
95
The Conclusion
96
Leading Discussions
97
Discussion Methods
98
Breaking a Problem into Subproblems
99
Starting Discussion
100
Starting Discussion with a Question
102
Starting Discussion with a Controversy
103
What Can I Do About Nonparticipants?
104
The Discussion Monopolizer
105
Testing and Grading
106
When to Test
108
Test Construction
109
How Long Should the Test Be?
110
How and When to Run the Experiment
123
Data Analysis
124
Oral Presentation of Your Results
128
The WriteUp of the Study
129
Drafts of the WriteUp
130
Archival Storage and Visual Presentation
134
A Note on Debriefing and Ethics
135
Concluding Comments
136
Acknowledgments
137
On Managing the FacultyGraduate Student Research Relationship
139
The Modified Apprenticeship Model
140
The Number of Research Directions Possible
141
Working with Other Faculty
142
Difficulties of Advising Graduate Students
143
Prototypical Examples
145
Partial Solutions to the Problem
146
Testing a Students Research Ideas
147
Danger Signals
148
Avoiding Difficulties
149
Research Grants A Practical Guide
151
Why Its Importance
152
Grants Support Students
153
How It Works
154
Some Potential Sources of Noise
155
Who What How and How Much?
158
Where to Submit a Specific Proposal
159
The Content of Research Proposals
160
Why RulesSilly as They May SeemReally Count
161
How Much? Where Budgets are Concerned Dont Let Your Ego Be Your Guide
163
Common Pitfalls to Avoid
165
And Then What? Obligations After Receiving a Grant
168
Reference
169
Writing the Empirical Journal Article
171
Analyzing Data
172
Reporting the Findings
173
For Whom Should You Write?
174
Writing It
175
The Introduction
176
Examples of Examples
178
Citations
180
The Results Section
182
Setting the Stage
183
Presenting the Findings
184
Figures and Tables
185
On Statistics
186
The Discussion Section
187
The Title and Abstract
188
Rewriting It
190
Some Matters of Style
192
Avoid Process Comments
194
Use Repetitive and Parallel Construction
195
Jargon
196
Voice and SelfReference
197
Common Errors of Grammar and Usage
199
None No one
200
Beyond Publication
201
ADVICE FOR SOCIAL SCIENTISTS IN NONACADEMIC SETTINGS
203
An Incompleat Guide to Working as a Nonacademic Researcher
205
Nonacademic Research Careers
206
Nonacademic Research Settings
208
Research Sponsors
209
Grant support
211
Research Teams
212
Preference for Generalists
213
Impact of Supervisors
214
Nonacademic Research Skills
216
Organizational Survival Skills
218
Professional Skills
219
Management Skills
221
Intellectual Breadth and Adaptability
222
Concluding Comments
223
Acknowledgments
224
Recommended Readings
225
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1987)

Dolores Albarracin" is an  R. David Thomas Endowed Legislative Professor of Psychology at the University of Florida. She is a recipient of several grants and awards and has published in the flagship journals of the fields of psychology and social psychology. She received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
Blair T. Johnson" is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Connecticut. A Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Divisions 8 and 9) and the American Psychological Society, he has served as Consulting Editor for leading journals in the field of social psychology, and is the author of a leading statistics program, DSTAT. He received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.
Mark P. Zanna" is a Distinguished University Professor of Psychology at the University of Waterloo. He is the Editor of ""Advances in Experimental Social Psychology"" and Co-Editor of the ""Ontario Symposium of Personality and Social Psychology."" A Fellow of the APA's Divisions 8, 9, and 35 and The Royal Society of Canada, he received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Yale University.

John M. Darley lives in Princeton, New Jersey, and is affiliated with Princeton University.

Bibliographic information