The Marble Faun

Front Cover
Courier Dover Publications, 2004 - Fiction - 291 pages
37 Reviews
Murder and romance, innocence and experience dominate this sinister novel set in mid-19th-century Rome. Three young American artists and their friend, an Italian count, find their lives irrevocably linked when one of them commits a violent crime of passion. Hawthorne's final novel is "must reading" for its symbolic narrative of the Fall of Man.
  

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Hawthorne is a wonderful writer. - Goodreads
The ending is maddening! - Goodreads
His writing is sublime and efficient, but not spartan. - Goodreads
In that way it is a typical Hawthorne ending. - Goodreads

Review: The Marble Faun (Oxford World's Classics)

User Review  - Linda Gaines - Goodreads

Hawthorne is a wonderful writer. I loved some of the descriptions and the thoughts of good and evil. I didn't like the ending as well as the rest of the novel. Read full review

Review: The Marble Faun (Oxford World's Classics)

User Review  - Edward - Goodreads

Hawthorne's last completed novel, based on the year and a half he spent in Italy, is sporadically interesting, but it is never going to displace THE SCARLET LETTER as his masterpiece. Everyone has ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Miriam Hilda Kenyon Donatello
1
The Faun
5
Subterranean Reminiscences
10
The Specter of the Catacomb
14
Miriamss Studio
20
The Virgins Shrine
29
Beatrice
36
The Suburban Villa
41
Myths
149
The Owl Tower
155
On the Battlements
160
Donatellos Bust
167
The Marble Saloon
172
Scenes by the Way
179
Pictured Windows
186
Market Day in Perugia
192

The Faun and Nymph
45
The Sylvan Dance
50
Fragmentary Sentences
54
A Stroll on the Pincian
59
A Sculptors Studio
68
Cleopatra
74
An Aesthetic Company
79
A Moonlight Ramble
86
Miriams Trouble
93
On the Edge of a Precipice
98
The Fauns Transformation
105
The Burial Chant
109
The Dead Capuchin
114
The Medici Gardens
120
Miriam and Hilda
124
The Tower Among the Appennines
130
Sunshine
135
The Pedigree of Monte Beni
142
The Bronze Pontiffs Benediction
196
Hildas Tower
202
The Emptiness of Picture Galleries
207
Altars and Incense
213
The Worlds Cathedral
219
Hilda and a Friend
225
Snowdrops and Maidenly Delights
232
Reminiscences of Miriam
237
The Extinction of a Lamp
242
The Deserted Shrine
248
The Flight of Hildas Doves
254
A Walk on the Campagna
260
The Peasant and Contadina
264
A Scene in the Corso
271
A Frolic in the Carnival
276
Miriam Hilda Kenyon Donatello
283
POSTSCRIPT
288
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Nathaniel Hawthorne was born on July 4, 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts. When he was four years old, his father died. Years later, with financial help from his maternal relatives who recognized his literary talent, Hawthorne was able to enroll in Bowdoin College. Among his classmates were the important literary and political figures Horatio Bridge, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Franklin Pierce. These friends supplied Hawthorne with employment during the early years after graduation while Hawthorne was still establishing himself as a legitimate author. Hawthorne's first novel, Fanshawe, which he self-published in 1828, wasn't quite the success that he had hoped it would be. Not willing to give up, he began writing stories for Twice-Told Tales. These stories established Hawthorne as a leading writer. In 1842, Hawthorne moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where he wrote a number of tales, including "Rappaccini's Daughter" and "Young Goodman Brown," that were later published as Mosses from an Old Manse. The overall theme of Hawthorne's novels was a deep concern with ethical problems of sin, punishment, and atonement. No one novel demonstrated that more vividly than The Scarlet Letter. This tale about the adulterous Puritan Hester Prynne is regarded as Hawthorne's best work and is a classic of American literature. Other famous novels written by Hawthorne include The House of Seven Gables and The Blithedale Romance. In 1852, Hawthorne wrote a campaign biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce. After Pierce was elected as President of the United States, he rewarded Hawthorne with the Consulship at Liverpool, England. Hawthorne died in his sleep on May 19, 1864, while on a trip with Franklin Pierce.

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