Man the Hunter (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Richard Barry Lee, Irven DeVore
Transaction Publishers, 1973 - Social Science - 415 pages
1 Review
Man the Hunter is a collection of papers presented at a symposium on research done among the hunting and gathering peoples of the world. Ethnographic studies increasingly contribute substantial amounts of new data on hunter-gatherers and are rapidly changing our concept of Man the Hunter. Social anthropologists generally have been reappraising the basic concepts of descent, fi liation, residence, and group structure. This book presents new data on hunters and clarifi es a series of conceptual issues among social anthropologists as a necessary background to broader discussions with archaeologists, biologists, and students of human evolution.
  

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Contents

Problems in the Study of Hunters and Gatherers
4
The Current Status of the Worlds Hunting and Gathering Peoples
14
The Hunting Economies of the Tropical Forest Zone of South America An Attempt at Historical Perspective
24
What Hunters Do for a Living or How To Make Out on Scarce Resources
31
An Introduction to Hadza Ecology
50
Coping with Abundance Subsistence on the Northwest Coast
57
Subsistence and Ecology of Northern Food Gatherers with Special Reference to the Ainu
70
The Netsilik Eskimos Adaptive Processes
79
Demographic and Ecological Influences on Aboriginal Australian Marriage Sections
186
Australian Marriage LandOwning Groups and Initiations
201
Discussions Part IV
210
Comments and Rejoinder
211
c The Use of Misuse of Models
213
A NonAustralian Example
217
Epidemiological Factors Health and Disease in HunterGatherers
222
Some Predictions for the Pleistocene Based on Equilibrium Systems among Recent HunterGatherers
230

Discussions Part II
84
b Notes on the Original Affluent Society
86
c Does Hunting Bring Happiness?
90
d Hunting vs Gathering as Factors in Subsistence
93
e Measuring Resources and Subsistence Strategy
95
Ownership and Use of Land among the Australian Aborigines
100
Stability and Flexibility in Hadza Residential Groupings
104
The Diversity of Eskimo Societies
112
The Nature of Dogrib Socioterritorial Groups
119
The Birhor of India and Some Comments on Band Organization
127
The Importance of Flux in Two Hunting Societies
133
Southeastern Australia Level of Social Organization
139
Discussions Part III
147
b The Problem of Lineage Organization
150
c Analysis of Group Composition
151
d Social Determinants of Group Size
156
e Resolving Conflicts by Fission
157
g Predation and Warfare
158
Some Problems of Method
159
A Shoshoni Example
162
Gidjingali Marriage Arrangements
166
Marriage Classes and Demography in Central Australia
177
Discussions Part V
242
Infanticide Disease Nutrition and Food Supply
244
Determinants of Group Size in Modern and Pleistocene Hunters
246
d Pleistocene Family Planning
249
Traces of Pleistocene Hunters An East African Example
254
A Theoretical Framework for Interpreting Archeological Materials
263
Methodological Considerations of the Archeological Use of Ethnographic Data
269
Ethnographic Data and Understanding the Pleistocene
275
Studies of HunterGatherers as an Aid to the Interpretation of Prehistoric Societies
277
Discussions Part VI
282
b The Archeological Visibility of Food Gatherers
286
c The Use of Ethnography in Reconstructing the Past
288
The Evolution of Hunting
294
Hunting An Integrating Biobehavior System and Its Evolutionary Importance
305
Causal Factors and Processes in the Evolution of Prefarming Societies
322
Discussions Part VII
336
b Primate Behavior and the Evolution of Aggression
340
c Future Agenda
345
The Concept of Primitiveness
350
References
354
Index
394
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