A dry white season

Front Cover
Penguin, 1984 - Fiction - 316 pages
47 Reviews
As startling and powerful as when first published more than two decades ago, Andre Brink's classic novel, "A Dry White Season," is an unflinching and unforgettable look at racial intolerance, the human condition, and the heavy price of morality. Ben Du Toit is a white schoolteacher in suburban Johannesburg in a dark time of intolerance and state-sanctioned apartheid. A simple, apolitical man, he believes in the essential fairness of the South African government and its policiesuntil the sudden arrest and subsequent "suicide" of a black janitor from Du Toit's school. Haunted by new questions and desperate to believe that the man's death was a tragic accident, Du Toit undertakes an investigation into the terrible affaira quest for the truth that will have devastating consequences for the teacher and his family, as it draws him into a lethal morass of lies, corruption, and murder.

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Review: A Dry White Season

User Review  - Colleen - Goodreads

This book helped me understand something about what was going on in South Africa from a place of near ignorance, but of wanting to know. I had been in Zimbabwe for a few years, and had many South ... Read full review

Review: A Dry White Season

User Review  - Annemariem - Goodreads

Human drama on a grand scale. Every step the main character takes, brings him closer to the precipice, yet you can't help but urge him onwards. Searing commentary on South-African politics in the seventies. Who can you trust? Read full review

Contents

I
7
II
35
III
77
Copyright

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About the author (1984)

André Brink is a South African writer and educator. He was born on May 29, 1935 in Vrede, South Africa. Brink studied at Potchefstroom in South Africa and later in Paris. Brink became a part of a group of writers known as the Sixtiers upon returning to South Africa in the 1960s. The group aimed to broaden Afrikaner fiction by writing about sexual and moral matters and the failings of the traditional political system. Two of Brink's books, Looking on Darkness and A Dry White Season, were banned in South Africa. Brink became a professor of Afrikaans and Dutch literature at Rhodes University and professor of English at the University of Cape Town. He has received the 1980 Martin Luther King Prize, the 1980 French Prix Medicis Etranger, and the 1982 Chevalier of the Legion d'Honneur. Brink has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize twice and nominated for the Nobel Prize for literature on several occasions.