American Indians and the Law (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Jan 31, 2008 - History - 304 pages
1 Review
A perfect introduction to a vital subject very few Americans understand-the constitutional status of American Indians

Few American s know that Indian tribes have a legal status unique among America's distinct racial and ethnic groups: they are sovereign governments who engage in relations with Congress. This peculiar arrangement has led to frequent legal and political disputes-indeed, the history of American Indians and American law has been one of clashing values and sometimes uneasy compromise. In this clear-sighted account, American Indian scholar N. Bruce Duthu explains the landmark cases in Indian law of the past two centuries. Exploring subjects as diverse as jurisdictional authority, control of environmental resources, and the regulations that allow the operation of gambling casinos, American Indians and the Law gives us an accessible entry point into a vital facet of Indian history.


  

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American Indians and the law

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

In the 1832 case Worcester v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized that Indian tribes were distinct political entities and thus held sovereignty within their territorial boundaries. The ruling ... Read full review

Review: American Indians and the Law: The Penguin Library of American Indian History

User Review  - J. - Goodreads

Excellent book. Difficult read as its long and detailed but I loved it. Covers history and law from past to present - makes an excellent reference document with everything in one place. Everything you always wanted to know about Tribal Law but didn't know where to look. Read full review

Contents

PART THREE
7
8
PART FOUR
9
10
CONCLUSION
NOTES

PART TWO
4
5
6
BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

N. Bruce Duthu, JD, is an internationally recognized scholar on Native American issues, including tribal sovereignty and federal recognition of Indian tribes. He is a professor of law at the Vermont Law School and a United Houma Indian Nation tribal member.

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