The Red cross girl [and other stories (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1916
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Page vii - He probably knew more waiters, generals, actors, and princes than any man who ever lived, and the people he knew best are not the people who read books. They write them or are a part of them. Besides, if you knew Richard Davis you knew his books. He translated himself literally, and no expurgation was needed to make the translation suitable for the most innocent eyes. He was the identical chivalrous young American or Englishman who strides through his pages in battalions to romantic death or romantic...
Page 385 - ... when he was yet a great way off.' He saw him, it says, 'when he was yet a great way off/ and ran to meet him.
Page xi - Davis it was a simple and pleasant pattern good and bad, honest and dishonest, kind and cruel, with the good, the honest, and the kind rewarded; the bad, the dishonest, and the cruel punished; where the heroes are modest, the brave generous, the women lovely, the bus-drivers humorous; where the Prodigal returns to dine in a borrowed dinner-jacket at Delmonico's with his father, and where always the Young Man marries the Girl. And this is the world as much as Balzac's is the world, if it is the...
Page x - Davis, you may be sure, would have illuminated the foul battle-field with a reflection of the glory which must exist in the breasts of the soldiers. The fact is, he was the owner of a most enviable pair of eyes which reported to him only what was pleasant and encouraging.
Page xi - Davis it was a simple and pleasant x pattern good and bad, honest and dishonest, kind and cruel, with the good, the honest, and the kind rewarded; the bad, the dishonest, and the cruel punished; where the heroes are modest, the brave generous, the women lovely, the bus-drivers humorous; where the Prodigal returns to dine in a borrowed dinner jacket at Delmonico's with his father, and where always the Young Man marries the Girl. And this is the world as much as Balzac's is the world, if it is...
Page 181 - ... town, and later, at Albany, represented the district in the Assembly. From Albany he entered a law office in New York City; and in the cause of reform had fought so many good fights, that on an independent ticket, much to his surprise, he had been lifted to the high position he now held. No more in his manner than in his appearance did Winthrop suggest the popular conception of his role. He was not professional, not mysterious. Instead, he was sane, cheerful, tolerant. It was his philosophy to...
Page 238 - Mannie eagerly. He was deeply concerned lest the distinguished cross-examiner should think that from him of his lurid past he could withhold anything. "I had my coat off and you said you'd make it hot for me." "Did I?" asked Winthrop with an effort at recollection. "No, you didn't!" Mannie hastened to reassure him. "I mean, you didn't make it hot for me.

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