Osmin's Rage: Philosophical Reflections on Opera, Drama, and Text, with a New Final Chapter

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Cornell University Press, 1999 - Music - 317 pages
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In his new concluding chapter, Peter Kivy advances his argument on behalf of a distinctive intellectual and musical character of opera before Mozart. He proposes that happy endings were a musical—as opposed to a dramatic—necessity for opera during this period and that Mozart's Idomeneo is properly enjoyed and judged only when listeners are attuned to its seventeenth and eighteenth-century forebears.
  

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Contents

Ecstasy and prophecy
3
opera as invented art
16
Enter Philosophy in Classical attire
28
The musical parameters
49
Philosophy and Psychology in early modern dress
97
The irrational entertainment as rational solution
133
Listening with the ear of theory
178
Expanding universe
188
Opera as music
252
Happy endings
283
Notes
297
Bibliography
309
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