Monsieur Pamplemousse and the Secret Mission

Front Cover
Random House, Feb 12, 1987 - Fiction - 200 pages
3 Reviews
"As light and naughty as a spiked creampuff . . . a bawdy romp in a French accent." Houston Post.
Monseiur Pamplemousse has been summoned by the director of Le Guide, the prestigious culinary magazine for which Pamplemousse writes restaurant reviews. The aunt of the director's wife, whose restaurant perpetrates some of the worst food in France, is demanding to be included in the next issue. With the director's marriage at stake, he dispatches Pamplemousse to the Hotel du Paradis.
There, Pamplemousse meets Aunt Louise, who serves him a dinner that causes his gorge to rise . . . and other things as well, for the meal contains an aphrodisiac of undeniable potency. Who would do such a thing? And why?

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Review: Monsieur Pamplemousse and the Secret Mission (Monsieur Pamplemousse #2)

User Review  - Nicole - Goodreads

Very cool books! Loved the plot and the setting. Will be searching out his other books as well. Read full review

Review: Monsieur Pamplemousse and the Secret Mission (Monsieur Pamplemousse #2)

User Review  - Drew Buddie - Goodreads

Was disappointed by this book. The constant references to French expressions meant that I felt alientated from the book as some of the phrases were never explained to the reader. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
21
Section 3
46
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1987)

Michael Bond is a writer of children's books. He was born in Newbury, Berkshire, England in 1926. During World War II, Bond served in the Royal Air Force and the Middlesex Regiment of the British army during World War II. After the war, he joined the BBC Radio and later worked for BBC-TV as a cameraman from 1947 to 1966. At Christmas 1956, Bond gave his wife a teddy bear that she named Paddington after the London train station near their home. In 1958, A Bear Called Paddington was published. It featured the illustrations of Peggy Fortnum. By 1981, there were 26 Paddington books. Bond also wrote television and film scripts, including a TV series on BBC 1 that first aired in 1976. In the 1990s, the animation company Hanna/Barbera made an American TV series about the bear. Bond set up a company to merchandise his creation that produced figurines, stationary, banks, and stuffed animals. Paddington also recorded a song titled Cross My Paws and Hope to Die in 1983. Bond chronicled his life with Paddington in his autobiography, Bear and Forebears. Some of Michael Bond's other works include A Day by the Sea, Something Nasty in the Kitchen, Bears and Forebears: A Life So Far and Monsieur Pamplemousse and the Carbon Footprint.

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