Michigan bird life: a list of all the bird species known to occur in the state together with an outline of their classification and an account of the life history of each species, with special reference to its relation to agriculture... (Google eBook)

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Michigan Agricultural College, 1912 - Birds - 822 pages
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Page 4 - ... southeastern South Dakota, eastern Nebraska, Kansas, and part of Oklahoma; nearly the whole of Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Maryland, and Delaware; more than half of West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and New Jersey, and large areas in Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia. Pennsylvania, New York, Michigan, and southern Ontario. On the Atlantic coast it reaches from near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay to southern Connecticut, and sends narrow arms up the valleys of the Connecticut...
Page 338 - Canada de las Uvas and near Gorman Station, at the west end of Antelope Valley, during the latter part of June and the first week of July. They were living in the burrows of Beechey's spermophile and were catching grasshoppers in the daytime.
Page 262 - The Marsh Hawk is unquestionably one of the most beneficial as it is one of our most abundant Hawks, and its presence and increase should be encouraged in every way possible, not only by protecting it by law, but by disseminating a knowledge of the benefits it confers. It is probably the most active and determined foe of meadow mice and ground squirrels, destroying greater numbers of these pests than any other species, and this fact alone should entitle it to protection, even if it destroyed no other...
Page 4 - Gnaphalium decurrens may be seen whitening thousands of acres. "One seldom -beholds a drearier sight than a dead and deserted lumber region. The valuable trees were all felled years ago, and the lumberman moved on to fresh spoils, leaving behind an inextricably confused mass of tree tops, broken logs, and uprooted trunks. Blackberry canes spring up everywhere, forming a tangled thicket, and a few scattering poplars, birches-, and cherries serve for arboreal life, above which tower the dead pines,...
Page 99 - Northern North America; south in winter to New York, Illinois and Utah ; breeding from the Gulf of St. Lawrence northward and south in the Rocky Mountains to Colorado; Greenland; Iceland; accidental in Europe.
Page 2 - The hardwood country lies south of latitude 43°, and consists of very fertile sand, clay, or loam, mostly cleared of the original forest, and largely cultivated. "The sandy or stony drift of many river valleys in this section supports a heavy growth of oak, frequently interspersed with walnut and hickory, while the margins of the streams, and the...
Page 535 - Distribution. — -Eastern United States to the Plains, breeding from Virginia and the southern portion of the Lake States northward to the Fur Countries.
Page 149 - Southern half of North America; now rare near the Atlantic coast, except in Georgia and Florida. The Southern Sandhill Crane, Common Brown or Sandhill Crane, as it is variously called, is found in the United States chiefly in the Mississippi Valley west to the Pacific coast and south into Mexico and eastward along the Gulf coast to Florida and Georgia. It is irregularly distributed and apparently...
Page 3 - Argillaceous tracts wooded with beech and maple also occur, like oases in a desert ; and swamps abound, with the usual lowland timber. Forests of hemlock spruce are frequent, and there are occasional ridges of oak. Birch (B. lutea) also begins to be a common forest tree, and attains a large size. The usual timber of the barrens is Jack Pine (P. Banksiana). Climatic and other influences have combined to produce groves composed entirely of this species of large size and of great beauty, for, instead...
Page 76 - ... tertials, white; sides, chestnut, black-barred. Female. — Smaller; head and neck, brown; chin whitish; back and sides, dark-brown, the feathers with paler edges; white on the wing less; bill, reddish at base below. Length, 17.50-19.00; wing, 7.50-7.90; culmen, 1.50; tarsus, 1.251.30. RANGE. — North America, generally, south to Mexico and Cuba, breeding nearly throughout its range. Nest, in hollow trees or stumps, made of leaves or grasses, lined with down. Eggs, 6-18; pearly-white; 2.15 by...

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