Cyber Racism: White Supremacy Online and the New Attack on Civil Rights (Google eBook)

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Mar 16, 2009 - Social Science - 274 pages
2 Reviews
In this exploration of the way racism is translated from the print-only era to the cyber era the author takes the reader through a devastatingly informative tour of white supremacy online. The book examines how white supremacist organizations have translated their printed publications onto the Internet. Included are examples of open as well as 'cloaked' sites which disguise white supremacy sources as legitimate civil rights websites. Interviews with a small sample of teenagers as they surf the web show how they encounter cloaked sites and attempt to make sense of them, mostly unsuccessfully. The result is a first-rate analysis of cyber racism within the global information age. The author debunks the common assumptions that the Internet is either an inherently democratizing technology or an effective 'recruiting' tool for white supremacists. The book concludes with a nuanced, challenging analysis that urges readers to rethink conventional ways of knowing about racial equality, civil rights, and the Internet.
  

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Jessie needs to do his or her research better. I went to school with Richard, he was the younger brother of a close friend and classmate. First and foremost, he is not Mexican-American, his family is Salvadorean. National origin is a big issue with in Latino communities and if the author is choosing to write about ethnicity, racism and civil rights, she or he should do so taking those factors into consideration. The sad part is that Richard had a lot going for him and many people sacrificed for him. I don't think he would have acted violently, and I know he was just being stupid and prejudiced, something too many people of different backgrounds struggle with.  

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Cyber racism is a cogent and well argued book about how to understand racism in the digital age. Daniels illustrates how racists have moved from print to electronic media. But even more importantly she effectively argues that, without media literacy and a critical race analysis, we are susceptible more subtle and pernicious forms of racism than overt racist comments from white supremacists. Particularly compelling are Daniels' arguments about cloaked sites (which disguise their authorship and true purpose) and her empirical work on how adolescents make sense of information about race online. This is well written and accessible book and "must read" for anyone who cares about racism in the digital era. It's also an excellent book for students who shouldn't overlook the interesting appendix about methodological strategies for conducting research online. 

Contents

Chapter 01 White Supremacy in the Digital Era
3
Chapter 02 Theorizing White Supremacy Online
17
Part 02 WHITE SUPREMACY IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT
27
Chapter 03 Individual Acts of White Supremacy Online
29
Chapter 04 White Supremacist Social Movements Online and in a Global Context
39
Part 03 WHITE SUPREMACY ONLINE
59
Chapter 05 Gender White Supremacy and the Internet
61
In Print and Online
91
Adolescents Making Sense of Cloaked Websites
139
Part 04 FIGHTING WHITE SUPREMACY IN THE DIGITAL ERA
157
Chapter 09 Combating Global White Supremacy in the Digital Era
159
Racial Justice and Civic Engagement in the Digital Era
187
On the Craft of Sociology in the Digital Era
195
References
207
Index
247
About the Author
253

Cloaked Websites
117

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2009)

Jessie Daniels teaches at Hunter College and writes and teaches about racism and anti-racism in print and online. She is the author of White Lies (Routledge). Daniels is a regular contributor to the blog Racism Review (www.racismreview.com ). Her research for this book was supported in part by the MacArthur Foundation.

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