Neither Man Nor Woman: The Hijras of India

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Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1990 - Eunuchs - 170 pages
9 Reviews
This ethnography examines a unique group - the Hijra - or eunuchs - of India, a religious community of men who dress and act like women. As a result of personal conversations with the author, the Hijras' function as an institutionalized third gender role is clearly described.

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Review: Neither Man Nor Woman: The Hijras of India

User Review  - Helen Stout - Goodreads

I found this book to be interesting and an eye opening cultural read. Read full review

Review: Neither Man Nor Woman: The Hijras of India

User Review  - Anastasia - Goodreads

A very light and informative read. Explores every aspects of hijras and their roles within their community, as well as their role in the Indian community as well. A bit contradictory at times, but ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER THREE
24
CHAPTER FOUR
38
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Serena Nanda is professor emeritus of anthropology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. Her most recent book is THE GIFT OF THE BRIDE: A TALE OF ANTHROPOLOGY, MATRIMONY, AND MURDER, a novel set in an Indian immigrant community in New York City. Her other published works include NEITHER MAN NOR WOMAN: THE HIJRAS OF INDIA, winner of the 1990 Ruth Benedict Prize; AMERICAN CULTURAL PLURALISM AND LAW; GENDER DIVERSITY: CROSS-CULTURAL VARIATIONS; and a New York City guidebook, NEW YORK MORE THAN EVER: 40 PERFECT DAYS IN AND AROUND THE CITY. She has always been captivated by the stories people tell and by the tapestry of human diversity. Anthropology was the perfect way for her to immerse herself in these passions, and through teaching, to spread the word about the importance of understanding both human differences and human similarities.

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