Hand-books of Natural Philosophy and Astronomy, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Blanchard and Lea, 1858 - Astronomy
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Contents

CHAP I
92
8 Page
93
ameter of an object
103
The celestial hemisphere
116
Sidereal time
120
Proof by the descent of a body
126
Objects in celestial equator equal
132
Loss of weight at other latitudes
138
Transit Instrument
152
Right ascension
158
Position of an object defined by
164
Sect Page
169
Argument from analogy
176
Mean solar or civil time
182
Perihelion and aphelion of
188
Hourly motion apparent and real
194
CHAP X
223
Range of the tides
229
Spots
236
Observations and drawings of
239
Calorific power of solar rays
246
the ecliptic 287
257
Beet P go
268
Suns attraction on planets com
274
Methods for determining
280
Heliocentric and synodic motions
288
Method of ascertaining thediurnal
294
Beet Page
298
Division of the synodic period
304
Position of areographic meridians
309
Table snowing the number
315
Sect Page 2777 Variation of superficial gravity from equator to pole
339
Utility of the Jorian system as an Ulujtrationofthe solar system
340
Saturnian system 841
341
Synodic motion
342
2787 Jreat scale of the orbital motion
343
Stations and retrogressions
344
Surface and volume
345
Belts and atmosphere
346
Position of nodes of rings and in clination to ecliptic
348
Conditions which determine the phases of the ring
349
Apparent and real dimensions of the rings _
352
Thickness of the rings
353
Illumination of the ringshelio centric phases
354
Shadow projected by the planet on the rings
356
The shadows partially vi ible from the earth
357
Schmidts observations and draw ings of Saturawith the ring seen edgeways
360
Observations of Herachel
361
Ring probably triple Observa tions of MM Lassell and Dawes
362
Alleged discovery of obscure rings by MM Lassell and Bond
363
2817 Bessels calculation of the mass of the rings
364
Rotation of the rings
366
Satellites
367
Sect page 2826 Their distances and periods
368
Various phases and appearances of the satellites to observers on the planet
369
Apparent magnitudes as seen from Saturn
370
Apparent magnitudes of Saturn seen from the satellites
371
Mass of Saturn
372
284L Variation of gravity from equator to pole
373
Views of Sir John Herschel
374
2S45 Correction of the preceding views
375
Phenomena presented to an obser ver stationed at Saturns equa tor Zone of the firm amen toov ered by the ring
376
Saturnian seasons
387
2S66 Period by synodic motion
388
Synodic motion 889
389
Vast scale of the orbital motion
390
Comparison of the effects of
401
General conditions which deter
407
Possibility of annular eclipses
415
projected on the suns disk
422
Causes of lunar eclipses
431
Eclipses Transits and Occcltations
437
Feci Page
438
Intervals of the occurrence
444
Determination of longitudes
450
Table of the elements of the orbits
456
Surfaces and volumes Table
463
Strikingly illustrated by cometary
469
Planets observe In their motions
476
Enckes comet
483
Fayes comet
489
Probable identity of De Tlcos
495
Great advance of mathematical
501
3072 Tabular synopsis of twentyone
509
TI Parabolic Comets
515
Light of comets 623
523
Its appearance on the2Jthof Sept 627
528
Observations and drawings
531
Conditions under which elliptic
533
Orthogonal component
539
Effects of a positive radial compo
545
It produces progression of the
551
Sect Page
552
CHAP XX
558
How the direction of the disturb
564
CHAP XXI
574
Analysis of the variations of sign
580
Effect upon the form of
586
Clarification of the cometary
590
First Case
592
Why the same inequalities are
611
Perturbations of the fourth satel
617
Effects of the disturbing force
629
Other long inequalities
635
Secular variation of inclination
641
Distance of pole of equator from
647
CHAP XXV
655
How the distance is inferred from
661
Case of two stars having equal
667
fleet Page
671
Principle on which the successive
677
Space penetrating power
687
Effects on eccentricity
693
Temporary star observed by
699
The sun not a fixed centre
711
Sect Page
717
Milky way
718
CHAP XXX
734
drawing
737
The Oxford heliometerwith draw
739
The transit circle by Trough ton
741
The Pultowa prime vertical
743
The Northumberland telescope
752
Copyright

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Page 768 - Murray's Encyclopaedia of Geography ; comprising a complete Description of the Earth : Exhibiting its Relation to the Heavenly Bodies, its Physical Structure, the Natural History of each Country, and the Industry, Commerce, Political Institutions, and Civil and Social State of All Nations. Second Edition ; with 82 Maps, and upwards of 1,000 other Woodcuts. 8vo. price 60s. Neale.
Page 314 - On such planets giants might exist; and those enormous animals, which on earth require the buoyant power of water to counteract their weight, might there be denizens of the land.
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Page 226 - Ostend, toward which the wind was blowing, contrary effects were observed. During strong north-westerly gales the tide marks high water earlier in the Thames than otherwise, and does not give so much water, while the ebb tide runs out late, and marks lower ; but upon the gales abating and weather moderating, the tides put in and rise much higher, while they also run longer before high water is marked, and with more velocity of current : nor do they run out so long or so low.
Page 466 - shows us the things which will be hereafter," not obscurely shadowed out in figures and in parables, as must necessarily be the case with other revelations, but attended with the most minute precision of time, place, and circumstance. He converts the hours as they roll into an ever-present miracle, in attestation of those laws which his Creator...
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Page 364 - ... rings. Supposing them mathematically perfect in their circular form, and exactly concentric with the planet, it is demonstrable that they would form (in spite of their centrifugal force) a system in a state of unstable equilibrium, which the slightest external power would subvert not by causing a rupture in the substance of the rings but by precipitating them, unbroken, on the surface of the planet.
Page 466 - Governor" of the world, in his inscrutable wisdom, to baffle our inquiries into the nature and proximate cause of that wonderful faculty of intellect that image of his own essence which he has conferred upon us ; nay, the springs and...

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