The Mississippi and the making of a nation: from the Louisiana purchase to today

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National Geographic, Oct 1, 2002 - History - 273 pages
3 Reviews
From northern Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico, the Mississippi River runs its course along the borders of ten states and cleanly bisects the nation. But the Mississippi is more than an imposing natural landmark; it is embedded in every facet of America’s national identity. Stephen E. Ambrose, renowned author of Undaunted Courage, historian Douglas G. Brinkley, author of The Unfinished Presidency, and award-winning National Geographic photographer Sam Abell traveled the entire length of the Mississippi—from its mouth at Delacroix Island, Louisiana, to its source at Itasca, Minnesota—to bring readers the full, rich history of AmericaĚs great river. In 11 chapters, each covering a length of the river, readers will witness the early explorations of DeSoto and the momentous signing of the Louisiana Purchase; they will meet Jim Bowie, Ulysses S. Grant, and Robert Johnson; they will relive the Civil War and the Great Flood, the Underground Railroad and the Trail of Tears; and they will discover the immense impact of the Mississippi on American arts, from the birth of the Blues to the literature of Mark Twain and T.S. Eliot. To expand the book’s visual dimension, each chapter of The Mississippi and the Making of a Nation is illustrated with period paintings, lithographs, artifacts, and maps, and features unique photographic essays by Sam Abell. The result is a lively, comprehensive, and beautiful work that panoramically explores and celebrates the American icon that is the Mighty Mississippi as it celebrates America itself.

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Review: The Mississippi and the Making of a Nation

User Review  - Eli - Goodreads

Interesting history of the Mississippi. Read full review

Review: The Mississippi and the Making of a Nation

User Review  - Eli - Goodreads

Interesting history of the Mississippi. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
6
Section 2
24
Section 3
37
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Dr. Stephen Ambrose was a renowned historian and acclaimed author of more than 30 books. Among his "New York Times" best-sellers are: "Nothing Like It in the World, Citizen Soldiers, Band of Brothers, D-Day - June 6, 1944, " and "Undaunted Courage".

He was not only a great author, but also a captivating speaker, with the unique ability to provide insight into the future by employing his profound knowledge of the past. His stories demonstrate how leaders use trust, friendship and shared experiences to work together and thrive during conflict and change. His philosophy about keeping an audience engaged is put best in his own words:

As I sit at my computer, or stand at the podium, I think of myself as sitting around the campfire after a day on the trail, telling stories that I hope will have the members of the audience, or the readers, leaning forward just a bit, wanting to know what happens next.

Dr. Ambrose was a retired Boyd Professor of History at the University of New Orleans. He was the Director Emeritus of the Eisenhower Center in New Orleans, and the founder of the National D-Day Museum. He was also a contributing editor for the "Quarterly Journal of Military History, " a member of the board of directors for American Rivers, and a member of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Council Board.

His talents have not gone unnoticed by the film industry. Dr. Ambrose was the historical consultant for Steven Spielberg's movie Saving Private Ryan. Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks purchased the film rights to his books "Citizen Soldiers" and "Band of Brothers" to make the 13-hour HBO mini-series Band of Brothers.

He has also participated in numerous national television programs, including ones for the History Channel and "National Geographic.

Patricia Daniels is an author and editor for National Geographic who has written, edited, or contributed to books on history, science, and geography, most recently the "National Geographic Encyclopedia of Space." She lives in State College, Pennsylvania.
Stephen G. Hyslop has been a writer and editor for Time-Life Books and National Geographic, as well as author of "Bound for Santa Fe" and "Chroniclers of Indian Life." He lives in Virginia.
Douglas G. Brinkley is the director of the Theodore Roosevelt Center for American Civilization and Professor of History at Tulane University. He authored two "New York Times" Best Sellers: "Tour of Duty: John Kerry and the Vietnam War" and "Voices of Valor: D-Day; June 6, 1944." He is the official historian for "NBC News." Dr. Brinkley is contributing editor for the "Los Angeles Times Book Review" and "American Heritage" and a contributor to the "New York Times"and "The New Yorker.

SAM ABELL's forty-year career has been dedicated to achieving art through documentary photography. He is well known for his work with the National Geographic Society, which published his recent books Seeing Gardens and The Life of a Photograph. In 1990, his midcareer retrospective, Stay This Moment, was the subject of a book and exhibition at the International Center of Photography in New York City. In addition, his career is the subject of the book Sam Abell: The Photographic Life, published by Rizzoli in 2002 and accompanied by a traveling exhibition organized by the University of Virginia Art Museum.