The personal relation in industry (Google eBook)

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Boni and Liveright, 1917 - Business & Economics - 43 pages
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Page 20 - Mr. Frank A. Vanderlip, president of the National City Bank of New York...
Page 42 - If in the days to come, as you have to do with labor, you will put yourself in the other man's place and govern your actions by what you would wish done to you, were you the employee instead of the employer, the problem of the establishment of the personal relation in industry will be largely solved, strife and discord as between labor and capital will give place to cooperation and harmony, the interests of both will be greatly furthered, the public will be better served, and through the establishment...
Page 17 - It is to be regretted that there are capitalists who regard Labor as their legitimate prey, from whom they are justified in getting all they can for as little as may be. It is equally to be deplored that on the part of Labor there is often a feeling that it is justified in wresting everything possible from Capital. Where such attitudes have been assumed, a gulf has opened between Capital and Labor which has continually widened.
Page 27 - ... to deceive a number of people sometimes, but you cannot deceive all of the people with whom you have business dealings all of the time. You may be able to make a contract which gives you an unfair advantage of the other man, but the chances are that you cannot do it twice. From a purely cold-blooded business point of view, honesty is the best policy. Likewise do I say that to treat the other man as you would have him treat you is an equally fundamental business principle. This does not mean that...
Page 12 - ... building up rather than weakening the morale of the armies. What is true as to the relationships which I have mentioned is equally true in industrial relations, and personal contact is as vital and as necessary there as in any other department of life. Let us trace briefly the history of the development of industry, that we may see where this personal relationship is present, where absent, and what is the effect of its presence or absence. Industry in its earliest forms was as simple as it is...
Page 24 - I cannot believe that Labor and Capital are necessarily enemies. I cannot believe that the success of one must depend upon the failure or lack of success of the other. Far from being enemies, these two factors must necessarily be partners. Surely, their interests are common interests, the permanent well being of neither can be secured unless the other also is considered, nor can either attain the fullest possibilities of development which lie before both unless they go hand in hand. Only when the...
Page 23 - Too often capital regards labor merely as a commodity to be bought and sold, while labor not infrequently regards capital as money personified in the soulless corporation. It might seem that technically speaking both of these definitions could be justified, but they are far from being comprehensive and adequate. For both labor and capital are men men with muscle and men with money. Both are human beings and the industrial problem is a great human problem. This is one of the first things we need...
Page 7 - Heretofore the chief executives of important industrial corporations have been selected largely because of their capacity as organizers or financiers. The time is rapidly coming however when the important qualification for such positions will be a man's ability to deal successfully and amicably with labor.
Page 35 - I will not take your time to describe this plan, but in substance it aims to provide a means whereby the employees of the company should appoint from their own number as their representatives men who are working side by side with them, to meet as often as may be with the officers of the corporation, sometimes in general assembly, where open discussions are participated in and any matters of mutual interest suggested and discussed ; more frequently in committees composed of an equal number of employees...
Page 22 - I add that almost beyond belief as these figures are, they do not include those terrible mental and moral losses growing out of struggle and conflict, nor do they take account of the depleted bank balances of the workers, and the hunger, suffering and distress which extend into the homes and which touch the lives not only of those immediately concerned, but of tens of thousands of innocent women and children. What I have said leads me to advance two ideas, both of which I believe to be profoundly...

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