The Swedish Settlements on the Delaware: Their History and Relation to the Indians, Dutch and English, 1638-1664 : with an Account of the South, the New Sweden, and the American Companies, and the Efforts of Sweden to Regain the Colony, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
University of Pennsylvania, 1911 - Delaware - 879 pages
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Contents

II
3
III
9
IV
15
V
22
VI
33
VII
38
VIII
44
IX
52
XXII
164
XXIII
182
XXIV
197
XXV
207
XXVI
219
XXVII
221
XXVIII
237
XXIX
242

X
69
XI
81
XII
84
XIII
84
XIV
89
XV
104
XVI
109
XVII
120
XVIII
131
XIX
135
XX
145
XXI
157
XXX
250
XXXI
258
XXXII
266
XXXIII
281
XXXIV
288
XXXV
301
XXXVI
345
XXXVII
375
XXXVIII
380
XXXIX
405
Copyright

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Page 458 - words of art" as he calls them, which Philemon Holland, a voluminous translator at the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seventeenth century...
Page 361 - O ! who can hold a fire in his hand By thinking on the frosty Caucasus? Or cloy the hungry edge of appetite By bare imagination of a feast? Or wallow naked in December snow By thinking on fantastic summer's heat?
Page 366 - I to the Church the living call, and to the grave do summon all, AR 1728.
Page 172 - BALTIMORE, his heirs and assigns, all that part of the Peninsula, or Chersonese, lying in the parts of America between the ocean on the east and the bay of Chesapeake on the west...
Page 456 - Stiernhook ascribes the invention of the jury, which in the Teutonic language is denominated nembda, to Regner, king of Sweden and Denmark, who was cotemporary with our King Egbert...
Page 209 - ... since) was accidentally there at that time. He, taking notice of the English and their desire, persuaded the other sachem to deal with them, and told him that howsoever they had killed his countrymen and driven him out, yet they were honest men, and had just cause to do as they did, for the Pequods had done them wrong, and refused to give such reasonable satisfaction as was demanded of them. Whereupon the sachem entertained them and let them have what land they desired.
Page 392 - Lands & Countrys lying adjacent or bordering upon the great Lake or Lakes or Rivers commonly called or known by the name of the River & Lake or Rivers & Lakes of the Irroquois a Nation or Nations of Savage people inhabiting into the Landwards betwixt the lines of West and Northwest conceiv'd to pass or lead upwards from the Rivers of Sagadahock and Merimack in the Country of New England aforesaid...
Page 360 - They will sometimes come out, still naked, and converse together, or with any one near them, in the open air. If travellers happen to pass by while the peasants of any hamlet or little village are in the bath, and their assistance is needed, they will leave the bath, and assist in yoking or unyoking, and fetching provender for the horses; or in...
Page 173 - Point, situate upon the bay aforesaid, near the river Wighco, on the west, unto the main ocean on the east ; and between that boundary on the south, unto that part of the Bay of Delaware on the north, which lieth under the fortieth degree of...
Page 168 - It is distinctly stated that one of the maps published in Doc., I. 12-13, was annexed to the memorial presented to the States General on the eighteenth of August, 1616, by the " Bewindhebers van Nieuw Nederlandt." It seems quite clear that the other map was presented by Cornelis Hendricksen with his report The river was soon after called by the Dutch the South River22 of New Netherland to distinguish it from the North River, or the Hudson. In 1620 Cornells May of Hoorn in the ship Blyde Bootschap23...

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