Legacies: a Chinese mosaic

Front Cover
Knopf, 1990 - Biography & Autobiography - 245 pages
11 Reviews
Bette Lord tells "the story of China through my own story, the stories of my family and those of a number of the people I met during my 40 months in China. As the very visible wife of Winston Lord, American Ambassador to China, Bette Lord is one of the few people who knows the authorities in Beijing as well as those who participated in the events of the "China Spring" of 1989.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
6
3 stars
0
2 stars
1
1 star
1

Review: Legacies: A Chinese Mosaic

User Review  - Larry - Goodreads

Gave me an interesting insight to China. Read full review

Review: Legacies: A Chinese Mosaic

User Review  - Everett - Goodreads

Poignant and touching. Read full review

Contents

Transitions
3
Black Armbands Red Armbands
16
The Actress
31
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1990)

Bette Bao Lord, Bette Bao Lord was born in Shanghai and came to the United States when she was eight years old. Her father, a British trained engineer, was sent to the U.S. in 1946 by the Chinese government to purchase equipment. The family was stranded, in 1947, when Mao Zedong and the communist rebels won the civil war in China. Lord received an M.A. from Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and graduated with her B.A. from Tufts University. She married Winston Lord, former Ambassador to China and high Ranking State Department official. Lord's first novel, "Spring Moon" (1981), which is set in pre-revolutionary China, was an international bestseller and an American Book Award nominee for best first novel. She has also written about her painful childhood experiences, as a Chinese immigrant in the United States post World War II, in the autobiographical children's book "In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson." The book tells how she struggled to learn English and be accepted by her classmates. "The Middle Heart" spans 70 years of modern Chinese history, ending with the demonstrations in Tiananmen Square in 1989. She has also written articles for such publications as the Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, The New York Times, and USA Today. She has also co-produced The People's Art Theatre's Beijing production of The Caine Mutiny, directed by Charlton Heston. Ms. Lord has received the honor of an appointment by President Clinton to the International Broadcasting Board of Governors to oversee all U.S. non-military international broadcasting. She is also the chairperson the Freedom House, which promotes democratic institutions around the world. President Clinton said of Ms. Lord at one of the organizations conferences, "I'm honored to be introduced by someone who writes so powerfully about the past and is working so effectively to shape the future." She has sat on the Board of Trustees of The Freedom Forum, The Kennedy Center Community and Friends, and The National Portrait Gallery. She serves on the Advisory Council on Foreign Relations, Author's Guild, PEN, and the Organization of Chinese Americans. Some of the awards Ms. Lord has received include honorary doctorates from seven universities, the U.S. International Agency Award for Outstanding Contributions, The Women of Honor Award from the National Council of Women, the New York Public Library's Literary Lion, the American Women for International Understanding Award, the Qingyun Award from the China Institute, the Distinguished American Award, and the Woman of the Year Award from Chinatown Planning Council.

Bibliographic information