A Good American (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Feb 7, 2012 - Fiction - 432 pages
8 Reviews
“A beautifully written novel, laced with history and music.” —Emily St. John Mandel, author of Station Eleven

A LIBRARY JOURNAL BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR
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Everything he’d seen had been unimaginably different from the dry, dour streets of home, and to his surprise he was not sorry in the slightest. He was smitten by the beguiling otherness of it all.

 

And so began my grandfather’s rapturous love affair with America—an affair that would continue until the day he died.

This is the story of the Meisenheimer family, told by James, a third-generation American living in Beatrice, Missouri. It’s where his German grandparents—Frederick and Jette—found themselves after journeying across the turbulent Atlantic, fording the flood-swollen Mississippi, and being brought to a sudden halt by the broken water of the pregnant Jette.

 A Good American tells of Jette’s dogged determination to feed a town sauerkraut and soul food; the loves and losses of her children, Joseph and Rosa; and the precocious voices of James and his brothers, sometimes raised in discord…sometimes in perfect harmony. 

But above all, A Good American is about the music in Frederick’s heart, a song that began as an aria, was jazzed by ragtime, and became an anthem of love for his adopted country that the family still hears to this day.

  

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A Good American

User Review  - Wilda Williams - Book Verdict

This touching first novel by a British expat now living in Missouri traces four generations of one German immigrant family as they search for acceptance in America. (LJ 12/11)—Wilda Williams Read full review

Review: A Good American

User Review  - Barbara Young - Goodreads

I stopped reading about halfway through. There was no emotional content to this book, just a string of occurrences. I didn't care about any of the characters. It read like a bad family narrative actually written by someone's relative. Read full review

All 7 reviews »

Contents

FOUR
EIGHT
TWELVE
FOURTEEN
SIXTEEN
EIGHTEEN
TWENTYONE TWENTYTWO
TWENTYFOUR TWENTYFIVE
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Alex George is an Englishman who lives, works, and writes Missouri. He studied law at Oxford University and worked for eight years as a corporate lawyer in London and Paris before moving to the United States in 2003. To learn more about Alex George, please visit www.alexgeorgebooks.com.

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