Life on The Mississippi (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Mar 3, 2009 - Fiction - 400 pages
36 Reviews
At once a romantic history of a mighty river, an autobiographical account of Twain?s early steamboat days, and a storehouse of humorous anecdotes and sketches, here is the raw material from which Mark Twain wrote his finest novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.


  

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I love Mark Twain's writing. - Goodreads
Otherwise, it was hard to read. - Goodreads
Life absolutely excels in characterization. - Goodreads

Review: Life on the Mississippi

User Review  - John Valesano - Goodreads

The first half of the book is an enjoyable autobiographical sketch of Mark Twains early life in traing to become a river boat pilot. It relates the peak of the steamboat commerce on the Mississippi ... Read full review

Review: Life on the Mississippi

User Review  - Karen Chung - Goodreads

This is my favorite Twain work so far. I find with Twain that the more he is telling the truth, the more I like a work. I'm just not as crazy about his outlandish fictional concoctions. This book has ... Read full review

All 15 reviews »

Contents

I
1
II
6
III
11
IV
25
V
29
VI
33
VII
39
VIII
45
XXXI
189
XXXII
193
XXXIII
197
XXXIV
198
XXXV
205
XXXVI
211
XXXVII
216
XXXVIII
221

IX
50
X
56
XI
61
XII
67
XIII
72
XIV
79
XV
85
XVI
95
XVII
104
XVIII
110
XIX
115
XX
119
XXI
124
XXII
131
XXIII
134
XXIV
139
XXV
144
XXVI
150
XXVII
155
XXVIII
162
XXIX
170
XXX
176
XXXIX
226
XL
229
XLI
232
XLII
235
XLIII
241
XLIV
248
XLV
251
XLVI
253
XLVII
258
XLVIII
263
XLIX
267
L
273
LI
283
LII
287
LIII
293
LIV
298
LV
303
LVI
308
LVII
313
LVIII
319
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri, in 1835, and died at Redding, Connecticut in 1910. In his person and in his pursuits he was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimentaland also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called “the Lincoln of our literature.”

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri, in 1835, and died at Redding, Connecticut in 1910. In his person and in his pursuits he was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimentaland also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called “the Lincoln of our literature.”

Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri, in 1835, and died at Redding, Connecticut in 1910. In his person and in his pursuits he was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimentaland also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called “the Lincoln of our literature.”

Bibliographic information