Handbook of Health Behavior Research I: Personal and Social Determinants (Google eBook)

Front Cover
David S. Gochman
Springer Science & Business Media, Aug 31, 1997 - Health & Fitness - 540 pages
2 Reviews
This landmark treatise provides the first comprehensive review of basic health behavior research. In four volumes, multidisciplinary contributors critically assess every aspect of health behavior, giving special attention to the interrelationship between personal/social systems and risk behavior. Volume 1 presents useful conceptions of health and health behavior and describes the influence of personal, family, social and institutional factors. Each volume features extensive supplementary and integrative material prepared by the editor, the detailed index to the entire four-volume set, and a glossary of health behavior terminology.
  

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Contents

Health Behavior Research Definitions and Diversity
3
Preventive and Protective Behavior Illness Behavior and Sick Role Behavior
4
A WorkinProgress Taxonomy
6
What Health Behavior Research Is Not
7
HEALTH DISEASE ILLNESS AND SICKNESS
8
Lay versus Professional or Scientific Definitions
9
Pluralism of Definitions within a Discipline
10
Diversity of Focal Phenomena
11
Promising Concepts and Directions
216
Measurement Issues
217
The Family as a Social Unit
218
SUMMARY
219
Maternal Influences on Childrens Health Behavior
223
MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN MATERNAL SOCIALIZATION OF CHILD HEALTH
224
A Pathway between Maternal Beliefs and Behavior
226
Modeling and Reinforcement
227

CONCEPTUAL MODELS
12
Sociocultural Perspectives
15
CONSENSUS AND CONFUSION
16
SUMMARY
18
Historical and Cultural Foundations of Health Behavior A Comparative Approach
21
EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE ON SICKNESS AND HEALING
22
Medical Concepts
23
MEDICAL EVOLUTIONARY ASSUMPTIONS AND PRINCIPLES
24
CONCEPTUALIZING THE EVOLUTION OF MEDICAL SYSTEMS
25
Nature of Healmemes
26
Connection of the Medical with the Social
27
Levels of Selection of Healmemes
28
Feedback in the Medical Evolutionary Process
29
FamilyLevel Societies
30
VillageLevel Societies
31
States and Civilizations
32
Modern Industrial Societies
33
Postindustrial Societies
34
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
36
RESEARCH ISSUES AND IMPLICATIONS
37
REFERENCES
39
PERSONAL DETERMINANTS
41
Cognitive Representations of Health and Illness
51
COGNITIVE REPRESENTATIONS OF GOOD HEALTH
52
Empirical Validation of the World Health Organization Definition
53
What Does It Mean to Be Healthy?
55
Implications
57
COGNITIVE REPRESENTATIONS OF ILLNESS
58
Commonsense Representations of Illness
59
Supporting Evidence
60
A SelfRegulatory Model of Illness Behavior
61
CrossCultural Variations
62
Implications
63
FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
65
REFERENCES
67
The Health Belief Model and Health Behavior
71
ORIGINS OF THE HEALTH BELIEF MODEL
72
COMPONENTS OF THE HEALTH BELIEF MODEL
73
EVIDENCE FOR AND AGAINST THE HEALTH BELIEF MODEL
75
FACTOR ANALYSES AND DEFINITIONS
76
APPLICATIONS OF THE HEALTH BELIEF MODEL
83
Addictive Behaviors Perceived Threat
86
RECOMMENDATIONS TO RESEARCHERS AND JOURNAL REVIEWERS
88
REFERENCES
89
Beliefs about Control and Health Behaviors
93
Some Properties of the Internality Construct
94
A PersonEnvironment Fit Approach to Control Beliefs
95
Control Beliefs and Social Relationships
96
CONTROL BELIEFS AND HEALTH BEHAVIORS
97
Locus of Control Interactions with Social Support Processes
99
PHYSICAL HEALTHMENTAL HEALTH RELATIONSHIPS
100
Project Design
101
Results
102
Discussion
106
Critique and Implications
107
REFERENCES
108
Protection Motivation Theory
113
STRUCTURE AND PROCESSES OF PROTECTION MOTIVATION THEORY
114
REVIEW OF RESEARCH ON PROTECTION MOTIVATION THEORY
118
IMPLICATIONS OF THE ELABORATION LIKELIHOOD MODEL AND THE HEURISTICSYSTEMATIC MODEL FOR PROTECTION MOTIVA...
124
EXTENSIONS OF PROTECTION MOTIVATION THEORY
127
IMPORTANT RESEARCH QUESTIONS
128
REFERENCES
129
Behavioral Intentions in Theories of Health Behavior
133
Theory of Planned Behavior
135
SIMILARITIES AMONG HEALTH BEHAVIORS
136
RESEARCH ON EXERCISE BEHAVIOR
138
Measurement Issues
140
Protection Motivation Theory
141
Stages of Change Models
142
TOWARD AN INTEGRATED MODEL
143
From Reasoned Action to Habit
146
A PEEK INTO PANDORAS BOX
148
CONCLUSION
149
Health Services Utilization Models
153
ANDERSENS BEHAVIORAL MODEL
154
ANDERSEN AND NEWMAN UTILIZATION FRAMEWORK
156
ADAY AND ANDERSEN ACCESS FRAMEWORK
158
EMPIRICAL APPLICATIONS OF THE MODEL
161
Other Investigators
162
RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
163
Dependent Variables
164
REFERENCES
170
FAMILY DETERMINANTS
173
Families and Health Actions
179
Social Cognitive Theory
180
Emergent Characteristics of the Family
182
FAMILY INFLUENCES ON DIET AND NUTRITION
183
Familial Concordance for Diet
184
FOOD PURCHASE AND AVAILABILITY
186
DEVELOPMENTAL PHASES
191
Toddlers 12 Years of Age
192
Preschoolers 35 Years of Age
193
ElementarySchool Years
195
Adolescence
196
Adulthood
198
Family and Obesity
199
RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
200
Family Health Cognitions
207
Beliefs about Conditions and Interventions
208
Parental Role Dimensions
210
Summary
212
FAMILY DETERMINANTS OF CHILDRENS HEALTH COGNITIONS
213
Summary
215
ESTABLISHING A HEALTHPROMOTING CHILDREARING ENVIRONMENT
228
Mothers Socioeconomlc Status
229
Mothers Impact on Childrens Emotional Climate
230
Mothers Health
231
Mothers Supervision of Children
232
MOTHERS ESTABLISHMENT TRAINING AND ENFORCEMENT OF CHILD HEALTH BEHAVIOR
234
Sexuality Training
235
METHODOLOGICAL AND RESEARCH ISSUES
236
SOCIAL DETERMINANTS
241
Lifestyles Social Class Demographic Characteristics and Health Behavior
253
DEFINING HEALTH LIFESTYLES
254
HEALTH LIFESTYLE AS A NORMATIVE BEHAVIOR
256
BOURDLEU
257
THE SPREAD OF HEALTH LIFESTYLES
260
THE LATE MODERNPOSTMODERN CONTEXT
261
DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
262
MAJOR RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
263
SUMMARY
264
Social Attachments Group Structures and Health Behavior
267
GROUP TIES AND HEALTH BEHAVIOR
268
Relatives and Friends
270
Religious and Social Participation
272
PAROCHIAL STRUCTURES AND MEDICAL ORIENTATIONS
274
Parochial Structures In New York City
275
A Sociocultural Explanation
276
New Immigrants and Medical Resistance
277
Hispanics and Modern Medicine
278
LAY CONSULTATIONS AND ADVICE ON MEDICAL ISSUES
280
RESEARCH ISSUES
281
Sociocultural Contexts
282
Data Collection Strategies
283
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
284
REFERENCES
285
Sick Role Concepts and Health Behavior
289
Sick Role Behavioral Expectations
290
CONCEPT A DECADE OF CRITICAL COMMENTARY
291
Reformulating and Extending the Parsonian Model
293
Transformation of Medical Sociology into Health Sociology
294
The New Sick Role Concept and Lay Health Beliefs and Behavior
295
IS THERE A FUTURE FOR SICK ROLE RESEARCH?
298
REFERENCES
300
Changing Gender Roles and Gender Differences in Health Behavior
303
Methodological Cautions
304
SMOKING
305
Effects of Gender Differences in Risk Taking and Health Concerns
307
Other Effects of Gender Roles
308
Effects of Sex Differences In Biology
309
Summary
310
Effects of Gender Differences in Risk Taking and Health Concerns
311
Effects of Sex Differences in Biology
313
OTHER HEALTH BEHAVIORS
314
Exercise
316
Dieting and Eating Disorders
317
Physician Visits
319
CONCLUSIONS
321
Other Effects of Gender Roles
322
Multiple Psychosocial and Biological Influences
323
QUESTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH
324
INSTITUTIONAL AND CULTURAL DETERMINANTS
329
WorkRelated Determinants of Health Behavior
337
Work
339
Job Conditions
340
Psychosocial and Organizational Environment
342
Social Relations of Employment
343
Summary
345
Political Stance
346
Gender Issues
347
Summary
348
Leaving It Up to the Workers
349
But What Can You Do?
351
CONCLUSION
353
REFERENCES
354
Cultural Determinants of Health Behavior
359
CULTURE THEORY
360
A MODEL
362
PROBLEM DEFINITION
364
NEGOTIATING SICKNESS AND SHIFTS IN ROLE BEHAVIOR
366
LAY CONSULTATION AND REFERRAL
367
TREATMENT CHOICE
370
PROVIDERPATIENT INTERACTION AND TREATMENT OUTCOME
371
RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
373
CONCLUSION
375
REFERENCES
376
INTEGRATION
379
Personal and Social Determinants of Health Behavior An Integration
381
MAJOR CONCEPTUAL MODELS
382
SELECTED HEALTH BEHAVIORS
383
Care Seeking
385
Preventive Protective and Safety Behaviors
386
Risk Behaviors
387
Responses to Illness Adherence and Sick Role
388
Lifestyle Behaviors
389
COMMON THEMES
390
Methodological Issues
392
Professional versus Phenomenologlcal Perspectives
393
Role of Affect
395
FUTURE RESEARCH DIRECTIONS
396
Content Areas
397
SUMMARY
399
A Glossary for Health Behavior Research
401
Contents of Volumes IIV
417
Index to Volumes IIV
423
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