Transactions of the Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland (Google eBook)

Front Cover
W. Blackwood, 1867 - Agriculture
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 106 - ... set on, inclining upwards and curving slightly inwards; neck, long and straight from the head to the top of the shoulder, free from loose skin on the under side, fine at its junction with the head, and the muscles symmetrically enlarging towards the shoulders; shoulders, thin at the top; brisket, light; the whole...
Page 224 - ... Boards of Management, several of the earlier objects contemplated by the Society were abandoned, while the progress of agriculture led to the adoption of others of a more general character. The exertions of the Society were thus early extended to the whole of Scotland, and have since been continuously directed to the promotion of the science and practice of agriculture in all its branches.
Page 224 - SCOTLAND. Among the more important measures which have been effected by the Society are — 1. Agricultural Meetings and General Shows of Stock, Implements, &c. , held in the principal towns of Scotland, at which exhibitors from all parts of the United Kingdom are allowed to compete. 2. A system of District Shows instituted for the purpose of improving the breeds of Stock most suitable for different parts of the country, and of aiding and directing the efforts of Local Agricultural Associations....
Page 74 - THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT This is the farmer sowing his corn, That kept the cock that crowed in the morn, That waked the priest all shaven and shorn, That married the man all tattered and torn, That kissed the maiden all forlorn, That milked the cow with the crumpled horn, That tossed the dog That worried the cat That killed the rat That ate the malt That lay in the house that Jack built.
Page 106 - ... broad, and firmly attached to the body; the sole or under surface nearly level; the teats from two to two and a half inches in length, equal in thickness, and hanging perpendicularly; their distance apart at the sides should be equal to about one-third...
Page 106 - ... the length of the vessel ; and across to about one-half of the breadth. LEGS short, the bones fine, and the joints firm. SKIN soft and elastic, and covered with soft, close, woolly hair.
Page 504 - ... been selected with that care necessary to secure a trustworthy analysis upon which the farmer might safely predict the success of his mode of cultivation. In selecting soils for analysis, five or six spadefuls should be taken from different parts of the field, and, after being spread out in a thin layer for several days to dry, should be put twice, at least, through a fine sieve to insure uniform mixture. If a complete analysis be required, not less than two pounds should be sent ; for a partial...
Page 89 - every process connected with the milk, the butter, or the cheese, is conducted by...
Page 448 - ... consequence of their accession to the rebellion of 1745. The funds required to defray the expense of the charter, however, were raised by subscription, and the members then were only about 150. In 1799 the society began to publish its transactions or prize essays. At present its members number 4500. The ordinary subscription is £1 3s. 6d. annually, which may be redeemed by one payment of £12 12s. Tenant-farmers are admitted on a subscription of 10s. annually, or £5 5s. for life. The more important...

Bibliographic information